November 2015

24.11.2015

# Media

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CNN: Can we avoid climate apocalypse?

Article on responses to climate change, including CE. "[...] we invited authors, experts and activists to weigh in on the 2-degree target. What's at stake? And how can we actually get there?"

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24.11.2015

# New Publications

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Cao, Long; et al. (2015): Geoengineering. Basic science and ongoing research efforts in China

Cao, Long; Gao, Chao-Chao; Zhao, Li-Yun (2015): Geoengineering. Basic science and ongoing research efforts in China. In Advances in Climate Change Research. DOI: 10.1016/j.accre.2015.11.002

"Next, we introduce an ongoing geoengineering research project in China that is supported by National Key Basic Research Program. This research project, being the first coordinated geoengineering research program in China, will systematically investigate the physical mechanisms, climate impacts, and risk and governance of a few targeted geoengineering schemes. It is expected that this research program will help us gain a deep understanding of the physical science underlying geoengineering schemes and the impacts of geoengineering on global climate, in particular, on the Asia monsoon region."

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23.11.2015

# Calls & events

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News Review of Week 48

The news review of calendar week 48 in 2015 is now available here.


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23.11.2015

# Media

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Lecture Video: Hippocratic Oath for Climate Intervention Research

Video of the Panel discussion on Hippocratic Oath by the Forum for Climate Engineering Assessment.

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23.11.2015

# Media

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the guardian: Climate crisis: seaweed, coffee and cement could save the planet

On Tim Flannery's "third way". "Greenhouse gas levels are on track to exceed the worst-case scenario. But, as world leaders meet in Paris for the UN climate summit this month, Tim Flannery argues that there are still realistic grounds for hope"

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22.11.2015

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New York Times: Iowa’s Climate-Change Wisdom

On bio-CDR in soil. "Despite the fact that the United Nations General Assembly declared 2015 to be “the international year of soils,” a global soil carbon sequestration campaign — one that recognizes direct links between climate mitigation, regenerative agriculture and food security — rarely ranks at the top of any high level accords, or even conversations."

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22.11.2015

# Media

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Lighthouse News Daily: Taking Actions For Climate Change

"One the measures that came into question recently is geoengineering. This type of engineering uses several technologies in order to alter the global climate."

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20.11.2015

# Media

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The Suburban: Geoengineering examines the possibility of intentionally altering our global climate

"With every plan for geoengineering the idea can be picked apart and we can theorize as to the positive or negative repercussions. On the whole the risk is that geoengineering is totally untested, but more worrisome still untestable. As we only have the earth as a model we cannot test the theories of geoengineering without full planetary deployment."

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20.11.2015

# New Publications

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Zhe, Liu; Ying, Chen (2015): Impacts, risks, and governance of climate engineering

Zhe, Liu; Ying, Chen (2015): Impacts, risks, and governance of climate engineering. In Advances in Climate Change Research. DOI: 10.1016/j.accre.2015.10.004 

"This manuscript provides an overview of several aspects of climate engineering, including its definition, its potential impacts and risk, and its governance status. The overall conclusion is that China is not yet ready to implement climate engineering."

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20.11.2015

# Media

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International Business Times: Climate Engineering: Blocking out the sun won't fix climate change – but it could buy us time

"Could we directly engineer the climate and refreeze the poles? The answer is probably yes, and it could be a cheap thing to achieve – maybe costing only a few billion dollars a year. But doing this – or even just talking about it – is controversial."

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