November 2014

17.11.2014

# Media

0 Comments

the guardian: Will geoengineering make people give up cutting their carbon footprint?

"Wealthier people are more susceptible to the trap of saying they won’t take action on emissions when they know engineering the planet’s climate is a possibility"

Link


Read more »

17.11.2014

# Media

0 Comments

The Independent: Can seashells save the world?

"Coccolithophores are microscopic marine plants that convert carbon dioxide into chalk. It was thought that rising C02 and more acid oceans would curb their activity. Instead they are booming – and fighting global warming."

Link


Read more »

17.11.2014

# Media

0 Comments

Salon: Humanity’s epic planetary facelift: Climate change, mass extinction and the uncertain future of life on earth

"Salon talks to science journalist Gaia Vince about life on a transformed planet"

Link


Read more »

17.11.2014

# Media

0 Comments

Seattle Times: How to fight climate change by harvesting wood

"Using wood products to displace fossil-intensive product emissions while storing the carbon removed from the forest in building products is the kind of carbon-negative technology we need to reduce the risks of global warming."

Link


Read more »

17.11.2014

# New Publications

0 Comments

Oldham, P.; et al. (2014): Mapping the landscape of climate engineering

Oldham, P.; Szerszynski, Bronislaw; Stilgoe, Jack; Brown, Casey; Eacott, B.; Yuille, A. (2014): Mapping the landscape of climate engineering. In Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society 372 (2031). DOI 10.1098/rsta.2014.0065.

"In the absence of a governance framework for climate engineering technologies such as solar radiation management (SRM), the practices of scientific research and intellectual property acquisition can de facto shape the development of the field. It is therefore important to make visible emerging patterns of research and patenting, which we suggest can effectively be done using bibliometric methods."

Link


Read more »

16.11.2014

# Calls & events

0 Comments

CfP: Towards Integration: Linking the Discourses on Climate Ethics and Climate Engineering

Deadline 14.12.2014

"This special session aims at relating the conference theme of action and reflection to the emerging discourse on the relation between climate ethics and climate engineering."

Link


Read more »

15.11.2014

# Media

0 Comments

Discovery News: Could a Carbon-Scrubbing Rock Slow Climate Change?

"One such geoengineering solution, featured in a recent articles in the New York Times and the online publications Grist and Inhabitat, would utilize olivine minerals, a group of abundant green-tinted silicates that are formed from the cooling of magma after volcanic eruptions."

Link


Read more »

14.11.2014

# New Publications

0 Comments

Kniebes, Carola; et al. (2014): Validity of WTP Measures under Preference Uncertainty

Kniebes, Carola; Rehdanz, Katrin; Schmidt, Ulrich (2014): Validity of WTP Measures under Preference Uncertainty. Kiel Earth Institut. Kiel (Working Paper, 1972).

"Using data from two novel large-scale surveys on the perception of solar radiation management (SRM), a little-known technique for counteracting climate change, we compare the performance of both methods in the field. In doing so, we use the criterion of theoretical validity and measure the degree to which WTP values are consistent with theoretical expectations."

Link


Read more »

14.11.2014

# Media

0 Comments

WGC Blog: Forum – Where does the climate geoengineering conversation go from here?

Responses and forum on the New York Times artikle on olivine. "We invited a group of knowledgeable commentators to offer their take on the New York Times article"

Link


Read more »

14.11.2014

# Media

0 Comments

ClimateWire: Legal mess hampers understanding of a major CO2 sequestration test

Second part of the ClimateWire article. "The second phase of what is believed to be the world's largest ocean-based geoengineering experiment started out with an early morning knock on the door of the Vancouver offices of the aboriginal corporation in British Columbia that had conducted it."

Link


Read more »