23.07.2018

# Media

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UtilityWeek: CCS plants to be operational by mid-2020s, says taskforce

"The CCS taskforce’s report for the government, which is published today (19 July), recommends that the plants should be developed as part of two new clusters that would also include facilities to store the carbon dioxide captured during the process."

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23.07.2018

# Calls & events

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Job at The Center for Carbon Removal

No Deadline

"CCR is seeking a talented and passionate Policy Associate to advance federal policy research and education priorities for the organization."

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23.07.2018

# Calls & events

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Job at Carnegie Climate Geoengineering Governance Initiative

Deadline: 30. August 2018

"C2G2, as part of its external affairs outreach is seeking to hire an experienced Senior Advisor for Resource Development who would lead efforts to secure public funding for its work beyond this year. The position can be located anywhere in the world. The position would start as soon as possible after 1 September 2018."

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23.07.2018

# New Publications

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Muri, Helene; et al (2018): Climate Response to Aerosol Geoengineering. A Multimethod Comparison

Muri, Helene; Tjiputra, Jerry; Otterå, Odd Helge; Adakudlu, Muralidhar; Lauvset, Siv K.; Grini, Alf et al. (2018): Climate Response to Aerosol Geoengineering. A Multimethod Comparison. In: J. Climate 31 (16), S. 6319–6340. DOI: 10.1175/JCLI-D-17-0620.1.

"Considering the ambitious climate targets of the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to 2°C, with aspirations of even 1.5°C, questions arise on how to achieve this. Climate geoengineering has been proposed as a potential tool to minimize global harm from anthropogenic climate change. Here, an Earth system model is used to evaluate the climate response when transferring from a high CO2 forcing scenario, RCP8.5, to a middle-of-the-road forcing scenario, like RCP4.5, using aerosol geoengineering. Three different techniques are considered: stratospheric aerosol injections (SAI), marine sky brightening (MSB), and cirrus cloud thinning (CCT)."

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23.07.2018

# New Publications

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Lenzi, Dominic (2018): The ethics of negative emissions

Lenzi, Dominic (2018): The ethics of negative emissions. In: Glob. Sustain. 1, S. 1455. DOI: 10.1017/sus.2018.5.

"Limiting dangerous climate change is widely believed to require negative emissions. This prospect has sparked concerns about whether negative emissions could be scaled up quickly enough, along with concerns about their likely ethical costs. Building upon scenario modelling, this paper examines ethical concerns with negative emissions via the comparison of three alternate climate futures. This paper shows that the severity of concerns depends upon implementation conditions, and especially the extent of deferred mitigation. Negative emissions can be a valuable means of limiting dangerous climate change, or an unjust gamble against the future."

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23.07.2018

# Media

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coolaustralia.org: Geoengineering – Climate Control?

"Geoengineering is the idea of applying planetary engineering to Earth. This can be traced to the early years of the Cold War, when scientists in both the United States and the Soviet Union devoted considerable funds to controlling the weather as part of their military strategy. Some early geoengineering proposals included the damming of the Strait of Gibraltar and the Bering Strait as a way to warm the Arctic, making Siberia more habitable."

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23.07.2018

# Media

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Sci Dev Net: Why global South should lead solar geoengineering R&D

"As countries grapple with the challenges of tackling climate change, a new approach — solar radiation management (SRM) or solar geoengineering — which is being discussed as a way to cool the planet fast, is spearheaded by developed countries."

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22.07.2018

# New Publications

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Gutknecht, Valentin; et al. (2018): Creating a carbon dioxide removal solution by combining rapid mineralization of CO 2 with direct air capture

Gutknecht, Valentin; Snæbjörnsdóttir, Sandra Ósk; Sigfússon, Bergur; Aradóttir, Edda Sif; Charles, Louise (2018): Creating a carbon dioxide removal solution by combining rapid mineralization of CO 2 with direct air capture. In: Energy Procedia 146, S. 129–134. DOI: 10.1016/j.egypro.2018.07.017.

"As a part of the EU-funded CarbFix2 project, Climeworks and Reykjavik Energy have partnered to combine direct air capture (DAC) technology with the injection of CO2 into basalts, for permanent storage by mineralization of the injected carbon. This is the world’s first DAC installation that is combined with mineral storage of CO2. There is large potential for further optimization and substantial scale up of this joint operation. The organizations are developing an integrated CO2 removal solution that may be expanded and applied globally. This type of solution has been recognized as a crucial component in efforts to mitigate global warming."

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21.07.2018

# New Publications

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Zevenhoven, Ron; et al. (2018): Radiative cooling through the atmospheric window

Zevenhoven, Ron; Fält, Martin (2018): Radiative cooling through the atmospheric window. A third, less intrusive geoengineering approach. In: Energy 152, S. 27–33. DOI: 10.1016/j.energy.2018.03.084.

"The so-called atmospheric window, the 8–14 μm bandwidth where the atmosphere is transparent for thermal radiation indeed offers a “window of opportunity” for technology that enables sending out thermal radiation at rates that significantly exceed the natural process. This paper describes work that addresses this, with focus on technical devices that combine materials with the properties required for enhanced long wavelength (LW) thermal radiation heat transfer from Earth to space, through the atmospheric window. One example is a skylight (roof window) developed and tested at our institute, using ZnS windows and HFC-type gas (performing better than CO2 or NH3). Suggestions for several other system layouts are given."

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18.07.2018

# New Publications

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Merk, Christine; et al. (2018): Do climate engineering experts display moral-hazard behaviour?

Merk, Christine; Pönitzsch, Gert; Rehdanz, Katrin (2018): Do climate engineering experts display moral-hazard behaviour? In: Climate Policy 37 (6), S. 1–13. DOI: 10.1080/14693062.2018.1494534.

"Discourse analyses and expert interviews about climate engineering (CE) report high levels of reflectivity about the technologies’ risks and challenges, implying that CE experts are unlikely to display moral hazard behaviour, i.e. a reduced focus on mitigation. This has, however, not been empirically tested. Within CE experts we distinguish between experts for radiation management (RM) and for carbon dioxide removal (CDR) and analyse whether RM and CDR experts display moral hazard behaviour."

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