31.07.2018

# Projects

0 Comments

Project: Weather Modification in Australia and the United States: What Lessons for Governing Regional Climate Intervention?

"This PhD project will analyse the history of weather modification law in Australia and the United States to identify what lessons might be drawn for the governance, public participation and social acceptability of proposals for regional climate intervention."

LINK


Read more »

30.07.2018

# Calls & events

0 Comments

Newsletter of Week 31 of 2018

"The newsletter of calendar week 31 in 2018 is now available here."


Read more »

30.07.2018

# Calls & events

0 Comments

Jobs at Harvard University

No Deadline

"Program Director, Harvard's Solar Geoengineering Research Program (SGRP) and Program Manager of the Keith Group and SCoPEx"

LINK


Read more »

30.07.2018

# New Publications

0 Comments

Irvine, Peter J.; et al. (2018): Brief communication. Understanding solar geoengineering's potential to limit sea level rise requires attention from cryosphere experts

Irvine, Peter J.; Keith, David W.; Moore, John (2018): Brief communication. Understanding solar geoengineering's potential to limit sea level rise requires attention from cryosphere experts. In: The Cryosphere 12 (7), S. 2501–2513. DOI: 10.5194/tc-12-2501-2018.

"Here we review the literature on solar geoengineering and the cryosphere and identify the key uncertainties that research could address. Solar geoengineering may be more effective at reducing surface melt than a reduction in greenhouse forcing that produces the same global-average temperature response. Studies of natural analogues and model simulations support this conclusion."

LINK


Read more »

30.07.2018

# Media

0 Comments

Axios: We asked five experts about engineering the climate

"In the face of rising global temperatures, deploying technologies to change Earth's climate has gone from thought experiment to reality. We already capture carbon and store it underground. Now some researchers are suggesting we should spray the clouds with particles to reflect sunlight, fertilize the oceans to promote carbon-absorbing plankton growth, or build a gigantic shade that orbits Earth and opens as needed to shield the planet from the sun. Welcome to the Anthropocene — the era of humans engineering the world in unprecedented ways."

LINK


Read more »

30.07.2018

# Media

0 Comments

Red Green and Blue: Six ideas to limit global warming with solar geoengineering (Part 1)

"Scientists agree that cutting global greenhouse emissions as soon as possible will be key to tackling global warming. But, with global emissions still on the rise, some researchers are now calling for more research into measures that could be taken alongside emissions cuts, including – controversially – the use of “solar geoengineering” technologies."

LINK


Read more »

30.07.2018

# Media

0 Comments

Cosmos: 6 ways geoengineering could fight climate change

"Some researchers think massive engineering projects might help slow global warming. Other scientists aren’t so sure. Stephen Fleischfresser surveys the top six proposals."

LINK


Read more »

30.07.2018

# Media

0 Comments

The Liquid Grid: Ocean Storage of CO2

"Some ocean scientists are advocating for storing captured COemissions in the deep ocean. The reasons why might surprise you.  In this post I’ll investigate why some think ocean storage of CO2 is a good idea and the potential impacts it could have on the marine environment."

LINK


Read more »

30.07.2018

# New Publications

0 Comments

Maher, Damien T.; et al. (2018): Beyond burial. Lateral exchange is a significant atmospheric carbon sink in mangrove forests

Maher, Damien T.; Call, Mitchell; Santos, Isaac R.; Sanders, Christian J. (2018): Beyond burial. Lateral exchange is a significant atmospheric carbon sink in mangrove forests. In: Biology letters 14 (7). DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2018.0200.

"Our results indicate that the export of DIC and alkalinity results in a long-term atmospheric carbon sink and should be incorporated into the blue carbon paradigm when assessing the role of these habitats in sequestering carbon and mitigating climate change."

LINK


Read more »

30.07.2018

# New Publications

0 Comments

Beck, Silke; et al. (2018): The politics of anticipation. The IPCC and the negative emissions technologies experience

Beck, Silke; Mahony, Martin (2018): The politics of anticipation. The IPCC and the negative emissions technologies experience. In: Glob. Sustain. 1, S. 979. DOI: 10.1017/sus.2018.7.

"In the post-Paris political landscape, the relationship between science and politics is changing. We discuss what this means for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), using recent controversies over negative emissions technologies (NETs) as a window into the fraught politics of producing policy-relevant pathways and scenarios. We suggest that pathways and scenarios have a ‘world-making’ power, potentially shaping the world in their own image and creating new political realities. Assessment bodies like the IPCC need to reflect on this power, and the implications of changing political contexts, in new ways."

LINK


Read more »