04.08.2018

# Media

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IWR Online: The Federal Government allows ocean fertilization under certain conditions (German)

German article on CE.

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04.08.2018

# New Publications

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Pawlok, D.; et al. (2018): Grasslands may be more reliable carbon sinks than forests in California

Pawlok, D.; Houlton, B. Z.; Wang, Y.; Warlind, D. (2018): Grasslands may be more reliable carbon sinks than forests in California. In: Environ. Res. Lett. 13 (7), S. 74027. DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/aacb39.

"Using a set of modeling experiments, we show that California grasslands are a more resilient C sink than forests in response to 21st century changes in climate, with implications for designing climate-smart Cap and Trade offset policies. The resilience of grasslands to rising temperatures, drought and fire, coupled with the preferential banking of C to belowground sinks, helps to preserve sequestered terrestrial C and prevent it from re-entering the atmosphere."

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04.08.2018

# New Publications

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Mueller, B. L.; et al. (2018): Attribution of Arctic sea ice decline from 1953 to 2012 to influences from natural, greenhouse-gas and anthropogenic aerosol forcing

Mueller, B. L.; Gillett, N. P.; Monahan, A. H.; Zwiers, F. W. (2018): Attribution of Arctic sea ice decline from 1953 to 2012 to influences from natural, greenhouse-gas and anthropogenic aerosol forcing. In: J. Climate. DOI: 10.1175/JCLI-D-17-0552.1.

"We show that fingerprints from greenhouse-gas, natural and other anthropogenic forcings are detected in the three observed records of Arctic sea ice extent. Beyond that, our findings indicate that for the 1953 to 2012 period roughly 23% of the greenhouse-gas induced negative sea ice trend has been offset by a weak positive sea ice trend attributable to other anthropogenic forcing. We show that our detection and attribution results remain robust in the presence of emerging non-stationary internal climate variability acting upon sea ice using a perfect model experiment and data from two large ensembles of climate simulations."

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04.08.2018

# Media

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The Guardian: Pollution is slowing the melting of Arctic sea ice, for now

"The authors concluded that the combined cooling effect from human aerosols was detected in all three datasets of ice. That means, it didn’t matter whose measurements you used – the effect of aerosol cooling was present."

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04.08.2018

# New Publications

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Rau, Greg H.; et al. (2018): Negative-CO 2 -emissions ocean thermal energy conversion

Rau, Greg H.; Baird, Jim R. (2018): Negative-CO 2 -emissions ocean thermal energy conversion. In: Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews 95, S. 265–272. DOI: 10.1016/j.rser.2018.07.027.

"Conversion of the ocean’s vertical thermal energy gradient to electricity via Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) has been demonstrated at small scales over the past century, and represents one of the largest (and growing) potential energy sources on the planet. Here we describe how OTEC could be modified to provide a large source of CO2-emissions-negative energy while also allowing heat removal from the surface ocean, helping to directly counter ocean/atmosphere warming."

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04.08.2018

# New Publications

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Werner, C.; et al. (2018): Biogeochemical potential of biomass pyrolysis systems for limiting global warming to 1.5 °C

Werner, C.; Schmidt, H-P; Gerten, D.; Lucht, W.; Kammann, C. (2018): Biogeochemical potential of biomass pyrolysis systems for limiting global warming to 1.5 °C. In: Environ. Res. Lett. 13 (4), S. 44036. DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/aabb0e.

"Our results show that meeting the 1.5 °C goal through mitigation strategies including large-scale NE with plantation-based PyCCS may require conversion of natural vegetation to biomass plantations in the order of 133–3280 Mha globally, depending on the applied technology and the NE demand. Advancing towards additional bio-oil sequestration reduces land demand considerably by potentially up to 60%, while the benefits from yield increases account for another 3%–38% reduction (equalling 82–362 Mha). However, when mitigation commitments are increased by high balancing claims, even the most advanced PyCCS technologies and biochar-mediated co-benefits cannot compensate for delayed action towards phasing-out fossil fuels."

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03.08.2018

# Media

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The Economist: The world is losing the war against climate change

"The world is not short of ideas to realise the Paris goal. Around 70 countries or regions, responsible for one-fifth of all emissions, now price carbon. Technologists beaver away on sturdier grids, zero-carbon steel, even carbon-negative cement, whose production absorbs more CO{-2} than it releases. All these efforts and more—including research into “solar geoengineering” to reflect sunlight back into space—should be redoubled."

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03.08.2018

# Media

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Zeit Online: Greenhouse gases reach new record value (German)

German article on CE.

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01.08.2018

# Projects

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Project: Boosting coral abundance on the Great Barrier Reef

"The Queensland Department of Environment and Science (DES) and the Australian Department of the Environment and Energy (DoEE) are seeking innovative solutions to quickly restore the ecological functions provided by the Great Barrier Reef."

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01.08.2018

# Media

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The Conversation: Geoengineering the Great Barrier Reef needs strong rules

"A recent conference showcased new possibilities for enhancing Reef resilience, including boosting coral abundance and geoengineering techniques that would manipulate local conditions to reduce ocean temperatures."

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