28.01.2019

# Media

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Clean Technica: Why Excluding Nuclear, Fossils With Carbon Capture, & Biofuels From The Green New Deal Makes Financial & Climate Sense — #RealityCheck

"Recently, though, some vocal advocates have pushed back, claiming that the only way prices will stay low with large amounts of renewables on the power grid is to use nuclear power, fossil fuels with carbon capture, and biofuels, which they claim are 'zero carbon.'"

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28.01.2019

# New Publications

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National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (2019): Gaseous Carbon Waste Streams Utilization

National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (2019): Gaseous Carbon Waste Streams Utilization. Washington, D.C.: National Academies Press.

"In the quest to mitigate the buildup of greenhouse gases in Earth’s atmosphere, researchers and policymakers have increasingly turned their attention to techniques for capturing greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and methane, either from the locations where they are emitted or directly from the atmosphere. Once captured, these gases can be stored or put to use. While both carbon storage and carbon utilization have costs, utilization offers the opportunity to recover some of the cost and even generate economic value."

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28.01.2019

# New Publications

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Snyder, B. (2019): Costs of biomass pyrolysis as a negative emission technology: A case study

Snyder, B. (2019): Costs of biomass pyrolysis as a negative emission technology: A case study. In: Int J Energy Res 40 (7), S. 940. DOI: 10.1002/er.4361.

"Biomass pyrolysis is a promising method for the creation of biochar, a potentially long‐lived carbon sink, and renewable fuels. While a number of studies of the costs of pyrolysis exist, many fail to value the carbon storage benefit associated with biochar. Here, we evaluate the costs of three types of small‐scale pyrolysis systems (slow and fast, compared with gasification) in Costa Rica. We find that under many combinations of model parameters, fast and slow pyrolysis models are cost‐effective."

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28.01.2019

# New Publications

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Haque, F.; et al. (2019): Co-Benefits of Wollastonite Weathering in Agriculture: CO2 Sequestration and Promoted Plant Growth

Haque, F.; Santos, R.; Dutta, A.; Thimmanagari, M.; Chiang, Y. (2019): Co-Benefits of Wollastonite Weathering in Agriculture: CO 2 Sequestration and Promoted Plant Growth. In: ACS Omega 4 (1), S. 1425–1433. DOI: 10.1021/acsomega.8b02477.

"To lock atmospheric CO2 at anthropogenic timescale, fast weathering silicates can be applied to soil to speed up natural CO2 sequestration via enhanced weathering. Agricultural lands offer large area for silicate application, but expected weathering rates as a function of soil and crop type, and potential impacts on the crops, are not well known. This study investigated the role of plants on enhanced weathering of wollastonite (CaSiO3) in soils."

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28.01.2019

# Calls & events

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Job at Stockholm University

Deadline: 15. March 2019

"The project Glocalizing Climate Governance: The Role of Integrated Governance for a Just and Legitimate Adaptation to Climate Risks (GlocalClim) is funded by The Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning (Formas). The aim of this project is to understand the causes and consequences of global integrated governance responses for local and national climate adaptation, with a special focus on the global south. The project will provide new insights for Swedish and global academics and stakeholders into challenges and opportunities associated with integrating climate change adaptation into different policy sectors."

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28.01.2019

# Calls & events

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Call for Applications: Geoengineering the Climate. 2nd Summer School at Beijing Normal University 12-16 August 2019

Deadline: 30. March 2019

"Solar Radiation Management (SRM) is the most radical, controversial, and rapidly acting form of geoengineering. SRM is a set of proposals to reduce the impacts of climate change by means such as sulfate aerosol injection or marine cloud brightening. [...]. Apply before March 30 by sending a 300 word explanation of your motivation for attending, and current CV. Also indicate if and how much travel support is needed.  For further information and applications please contact John Moore john.moore.bnu (at) gmail.com."


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27.01.2019

# Media

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Eos: Managing Uncertainties in Climate Engineering

"Climate engineering, or geoengineering, looks at ways to temporarily offset climate change by deliberately modifying the climate system. One of the most studied ideas, which is the focus of a new special issue in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, involves stratospheric sulfate aerosols, mimicking the cooling experienced after large volcanic eruptions [Kravitz et al., 2018]."

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27.01.2019

# New Publications

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Rosenfeld, D.; et al. (2019): Aerosol-driven droplet concentrations dominate coverage and water of oceanic low level clouds

Rosenfeld, D.; Zhu, Y.; Wang, M.; Zheng, Y.; Goren, T.; Yu, S. (2019): Aerosol-driven droplet concentrations dominate coverage and water of oceanic low level clouds. In: Science (New York, N.Y.). DOI: 10.1126/science.aav0566.

"Lack of reliable estimates of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) aerosols over oceans has severely limited our ability to quantify their effects on cloud properties and extent of cooling by reflecting solar radiation – a key uncertainty in anthropogenic climate forcing. Here we introduce a methodology for ascribing cloud properties to CCN and isolating the aerosol effects from meteorological effects."

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21.01.2019

# Calls & events

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Newsletter of Week 04 of 2019

The newsletter of calendar week 04 in 2019 is now available here.


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21.01.2019

# New Publications

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Heyward, C. (2018): Normative issues of geoengineering technologies

Heyward, C. (2018): Normative issues of geoengineering technologies. In: TREVOR M. LETCHER (Hg.): MANAGING GLOBAL WARMING. An interface of technology and human issues. [S.l.]: ELSEVIER ACADEMIC PRESS, S. 639–657.

"This chapter gives a brief overview of the emergence of the idea of negative emissions technologies and solar radiation management technologies in climate change policy and the normative issues—questions of values—that they might raise. Normative issues fall into four broad categories: (1) distributive justice, (2) procedural justice, (3) ethical issues, and (4) rectificatory justice."

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