04.02.2019

# Media

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SingularityHub: Will These Massive Geoengineering Projects Fix the Earth—Or Break It?

"From planting continent-long forests to inducing rainfall, researchers have begun proposing, testing, and in some cases implementing large-scale geoengineering projects to radically transform the planet. These projects are designed to solve problems such as desertification, drought, or excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, all with the ultimate goal of combating climate change."

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04.02.2019

# Calls & events

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Call for Abstracts: The Regulation of New Technologies

Deadline: 28. February 2019

"The Tilburg Institute for Law, Technology and Society (“TILT”) is organizing the second edition of the PhD Colloquium on "The Regulation of New Technologies" which will take place at Tilburg University on 20 June 2019. The organizers invite PhD researchers working on any of the themes covered by this Call for Papers (“CfP”) to submit an abstract of max. 300 words by 28 February 2019."

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04.02.2019

# New Publications

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Williams, N.; et al. (2019): CO2 Capture via Crystalline Hydrogen-Bonded Bicarbonate Dimers

Williams, N.; Seipp, C.; Brethomé, F.; Ma, Y.; Ivanov, A.; Bryantsev, V. et al. (2019): CO2 Capture via Crystalline Hydrogen-Bonded Bicarbonate Dimers. In: Chem. DOI: 10.1016/j.chempr.2018.12.025.

"Human activities in the last one and a half centuries have perturbed the natural carbon cycle, shifting massive amounts of carbon from the geosphere into the atmosphere and leading to climate change at an unprecedented pace. [...] Here, we demonstrate a promising approach to CO2 capture based on crystallization of bicarbonate-water clusters with a simple guanidine compound. The CO2 separation cycle involves a unique proton-transfer mechanism via the formation of a carbonic acid dimer, leading to efficient CO2 release and quantitative regeneration of the guanidine compound and requiring significantly less energy than state-of-the-art carbon-capture technologies."

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04.02.2019

# Media

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Science: Scubalike technology could suck carbon dioxide from smokestacks

"The technology that allows submariners to breathe underwater could someday allow the rest of us to breathe cooler air. Researchers have found a way to suck planet-warming carbon dioxide (CO2) from industrial smokestacks using a chemical technique similar to one scuba divers and submarines use to “rebreathe” CO2-rich exhalations."

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04.02.2019

# Calls & events

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Call for Abstracts: The Role of Negative Emission Technologies in Addressing Our Climate Goals

Deadline: 1. March 2019

"It is clear that Negative Emission Technologies (NETs) can never be a wholesale replacement for reducing emissions but may be useful in displacing some energy/emission intensive sectors. It is unlikely that a single NETs proposal can be scaled sufficiently to meet this demand, and a portfolio of approaches may be more feasible. The primary removal methods of focus in this research topic of Frontiers in Climate will include all negative emissions strategies that directly mitigate climate change."

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04.02.2019

# New Publications

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Adánez-Rubio, I.; et al. (2019): Chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling. An advanced biomass combustion technology to avoid CO2 emissions

Adánez-Rubio, I.; Pérez-Astray, A.; Abad, A.; Gayán, P.; Diego, L. de; Adánez, J. (2019): Chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling. An advanced biomass combustion technology to avoid CO2 emissions. In: Mitig Adapt Strat Glob Change 6, S. 189. DOI: 10.1007/s11027-019-9840-5.

"Bioenergy with carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage (BECCS) technologies represent an interesting option to reach negative carbon emissions, which implies the removal of CO2 already emitted to the atmosphere. Chemical looping combustion (CLC) with biomass can be considered as a promising BECCS technology since CLC has low cost and energy penalty. In CLC, the oxygen needed for combustion is supplied by a solid oxygen carrier circulating between the fuel and air reactors."

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04.02.2019

# Media

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Financial Times: Could a superplant save the planet?

"The California campus, designed by Louis Kahn in the early 1960s, is one of the most celebrated examples of modernist architecture in the world. Its stark grandeur is as ambitious as the groundbreaking research taking place inside. [...] Now a group of them are tackling another life-threatening problem: climate change. They are setting out to do something that has never been done before, to create the “Ideal Plant” — one that will help curb global warming."

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04.02.2019

# Media

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Chemistryworld: Biomass carbon capture pilot points to a new sector whose time has come

"The Drax power station in North Yorkshire is in the final stages of commissioning Europe’s first trial of negative emissions technology. The demonstrator will capture carbon dioxide generated by burning biomass using a novel solvent developed by C-Capture, a spin-out from Leeds University. It follows successful laboratory tests, and the pilot project aims to trap one tonne of carbon dioxide a day with a capture rate of 90%."

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04.02.2019

# New Publications

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Whyte, Kyle Powys (2019): Indigeneity in Geoengineering Discourses

Whyte, Kyle Powys (2019): Indigeneity in Geoengineering Discourses. Some Considerations. In: Ethics, Policy & Environment 20 (2), S. 1–19. DOI: 10.1080/21550085.2018.1562529.

"Indigenous peoples are referenced at various times in communication, debates, and academic and policy discussions on geoengineering (i.e. geoengineering discourses). The discourses I have in mind focus on ethical and justice issues pertaining to some geoengineering research and (potential) implementation. The issues include concerns about potential inequalities in the distribution of environmental risks, research ethics, and abuses of social power."

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04.02.2019

# New Publications

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Helwegen, K.; et al. (2019): Complementing CO2 emission reduction by Geoengineering might strongly enhance future welfare

Helwegen, K.; Wieners, C.; Frank, J.; Dijkstra, H. (2019): Complementing CO2 emission reduction by Geoengineering might strongly enhance future welfare. In: Earth Syst. Dynam. Discuss., S. 1–24. DOI: 10.5194/esd-2019-5.

"We find that SRM has the potential to greatly enhance future welfare and should therefore be taken seriously as a policy option. However, if only SRM and no CO2 abatement is used, global warming is not stabilised and will exceed 2K. Therefore, even if successful, SRM cannot replace but only complement CO2 abatement. The optimal policy combines CO2 abatement and modest SRM and succeeds in keeping global warming below 2K."

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