31.07.2016

# Media

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Rolling Stone: Can New York Be Saved in the Era of Global Warming?

"But the truth is, barring deployment of a radical geoengineering scheme that quickly cools the planet, we have already heated up the Earth's atmosphere enough to guarantee that the seas are going to rise – and they are going to keep rising for a long time. Recent studies have shown that even if we stabilize the greenhouse-gas emissions at today's levels, the oceans will still rise by as much as 70 feet in the coming centuries and stay that high for thousands of years. In that scenario, New York will become an archipelago on the coast, with the high ground of Upper Manhattan and parts of Brooklyn and Staten Island just above the waterline."

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11.03.2016

# Media

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International Business Times: Geoengineering: Pumping water onto Antarctica will not stop sea levels rising

Media response on Frieler, K.; et al. (2016). "Unprecedented geoengineering methods will not be enough to solve the problem of rising sea levels, scientists have warned. A team from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research has assessed the idea of pumping sea water onto the Antarctic continent to see if it would be technically feasible, and if it could be of any help to tackle one of the immense challenges associated with global warming."

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11.03.2016

# New Publications

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Frieler, K.; et al. (2016): Delaying future sea-level rise by storing water in Antarctica

Frieler, K.; Mengel, M.; Levermann, A. (2016): Delaying future sea-level rise by storing water in Antarctica. In Earth Syst. Dynam. 7 (1), pp. 203–210. DOI 10.5194/esd-7-203-2016.

"In view of the potential implications for coastal populations and ecosystems worldwide, we investigate, from an ice-dynamic perspective, the possibility of delaying sea-level rise by pumping ocean water onto the surface of the Antarctic ice sheet. We find that due to wave propagation ice is discharged much faster back into the ocean than would be expected from a pure advection with surface velocities."

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