22.09.2017

# New Publications

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Burns, Wil; Nicholson, Simon (2017): Bioenergy and carbon capture with storage (BECCS). The prospects and challenges of an emerging climate policy response

Burns, Wil; Nicholson, Simon (2017): Bioenergy and carbon capture with storage (BECCS). The prospects and challenges of an emerging climate policy response. In J Environ Stud Sci 15 (2), p. 1360. DOI: 10.1007/s13412-017-0445-6.

"There is increasing impetus for large-scale deployment of carbon dioxide removal geoengineering approaches to help keep temperatures to below 2 °C, as provided for under the Paris Agreement. The primary option that has been discussed to date is Bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS). While BECCS could sequester very large amounts of carbon dioxide, it also poses substantial socio-economic risks to society, as well as threats to biodiversity. This essay suggests that a human rights-based approach can help to protect the interests of those who might be adversely impacted by BECCS deployment."

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23.06.2017

# Media

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Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists: The trouble with geoengineers “hacking the planet”

"Harvard crosses the Rubicon. But what has really catapulted the idea into the public eye is Harvard’s reckless plan for a privately-funded field trial testing some of the key elements needed for albedo modification"

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08.04.2017

# Media

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ETC Group: Why SRM experiments are a bad idea

"Solar Radiation Management (SRM) describes a set of geoengineering techniques that aim to counter human-made climate change by artificially increasing the reflection of heat from sunlight (solar radiation) back into space. Some advocates have started using the term “solar geoengineering” – but these techniques are not related to solar power production."

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02.03.2017

# Media

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Oxford University: World leaders warned of existential risks in new report

"World leaders must do more to limit risk of global catastrophes, according to a report by Oxford academics launched at the Finnish Embassy in London today."

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15.02.2017

# Political Papers

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Global Priorities Project (2017): Existential Risk. Diplomacy and Governance

Global Priorities Project (2017): Existential Risk. Diplomacy and Governance.

"Geoengineering technologies like Solar Radiation Management have the potential to mitigate risks from climate change, while at the same time posing risks of their own. The current lack of international norms on acceptable research practices may well be holding back safe exploration of climate engineering options."

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04.11.2016

# New Publications

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Keith, David W.; Irvine, Peter J. (2016): Solar geoengineering could substantially reduce climate risks—a research hypothesis for the next decade

Keith, David W.; Irvine, Peter J. (2016): Solar geoengineering could substantially reduce climate risks—a research hypothesis for the next decade. In Earth’s Future, n/a‐n/a. DOI 10.1002/2016EF000465.

"We offer a hypothesis that if SG were deployed to offset half of the increase in global-mean temperature from the date of deployment using a technology and deployment method chosen to approximate a reduction in the solar constant then, over the 21st Century, it would (a) substantially reduce the global aggregate risks of climate change, (b) without making any country worse off, and (c) with the aggregate risks from side-effects being small in comparison to the reduction in climate risks."

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22.08.2016

# Media

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Mercury News: Commentary: Need portfolio approach to climate risk

"No one believes solar geoengineering is a climate change cure-all. And, like almost all innovations, it has known and unknown side effects. For one thing, it doesn't deal with ocean acidification. For another, we don't yet know enough about its effects on atmospheric ozone, for example, or on rainfall, or how it might help one region and hurt another."

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15.08.2016

# Media

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FCEA Blog: Who May Geoengineer: Self-defense, Civil Disobedience, and Revolution (Part Two)

"[...] the paper is proceeding upon the basic normative idea that one cannot violate people’s rights in order to generate better social consequences and is then exploring whether risky geoengineering is consistent with or violates individual rights. In other words, “business as usual will be worse” is not good enough, on this view, to justify actions to intentionally violate people’s basic rights."

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10.05.2016

# New Publications

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Arino, Yosuke; et al. (2016): Estimating option values of solar radiation management assuming that climate sensitivity is uncertain

Arino, Yosuke; Akimoto, Keigo; Sano, Fuminori; Homma, Takashi; Oda, Junichiro; Tomoda, Toshimasa (2016): Estimating option values of solar radiation management assuming that climate sensitivity is uncertain. In Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, p. 201520795–201520795. DOI 10.1073/pnas.1520795113.

"This paper presents one possible methodology for estimating option values of SRM assuming a fairly moderate scenario on SRM’s use compared with preceding literature, which would be helpful to examine realistic values of SRM for the society where social acceptability of SRM’s actual deployment is not high. Our results emphasize the near- to mid-term role of retaining SRM as a later risk-hedging option in the face of the uncertainty about climate sensitivity."

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18.04.2016

# New Publications

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Mengis, Nadine; et al. (2016): Assessing climate impacts and risks of ocean albedo modification in the Arctic

Mengis, Nadine; Martin, T.; Keller, David P.; Oschlies, Andreas (2016): Assessing climate impacts and risks of ocean albedo modification in the Arctic. In J. Geophys. Res. Oceans. DOI 10.1002/2015JC011433.

"This study assesses climate impacts and risks of idealized Arctic Ocean albedo modification (AOAM), a proposed climate engineering method, during transient climate change simulations with varying representative concentration pathway (RCP) scenarios. We find no potential for reversing trends in all assessed Arctic climate metrics under increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations."

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