03.04.2018

# Media

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Wired: Ocean Acidification Could Be a Net Positive for Some Fish

"Some researchers are seriously considering geoengineering to reverse the slow acidification of the ocean. Dissolving minerals like olivine or limestone into seawater would increase its alkalinity. (Remember the pH strip in your 10 gallon fish tank? Blue=alkaline, red=acidic.) Not only would that make it easier on marine life, but it would also allow the ocean-sponge to soak up more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Two British scientists proposed this idea last year in a paper in the journal Reviews of Geophysics, predicting that with a bit more research (and money) it may be possible to capture hundreds of billions to trillions of tons of carbon without messing up the marine ecosystem."

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03.04.2018

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The Daily Catch: Environment The Geo-Engineering Idea That Could Theoretically Save The Ocean From Acidification

"To understand enhanced alkalinization, it helps to be reminded of some elementary school chemistry. On the pH scale, which measures acidity and alkalinity, lemon juice is acidic, plain water is neutral, and lime—not the citrus, but the mineral—is alkaline. When seawater absorbs carbon dioxide, chemical reactions reduce the ocean’s pH, making it more acidic."

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22.10.2017

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New Scientist: Dimming the sun could save corals from bleaching and hurricanes

"Time for artificial planet coolers? A cooling “sunshade” for the planet could reduce harmful coral bleaching and the number of hurricanes, which damage reefs. With the effects of climate change becoming increasingly apparent, the idea of squirting a cloud of sulphate aerosols into the upper atmosphere is being investigated by several groups of scientists. This would scatter some of the sun’s rays back into space, reducing the rate at which the Earth is warming."

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11.08.2017

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EOS: Preventing Climate Change by Increasing Ocean Alkalinity

"A recent paper in Reviews of Geophysics discussed increasing ocean alkalinity as an alternative method of carbon sequestration in response to climate change."

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18.07.2016

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Yale environment 360: How Growing Sea Plants Can Help Slow Ocean Acidification

"Researchers are finding that kelp, eelgrass, and other vegetation can effectively absorb CO2 and reduce acidity in the ocean. Growing these plants in local waters, scientists say, could help mitigate the damaging impacts of acidification on marine life."

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30.05.2016

# New Publications

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González, Miriam Ferrer; Ilyina, Tatiana (2016): Impacts of artificial ocean alkalinization on the carbon cycle and climate in Earth system simulations

González, Miriam Ferrer; Ilyina, Tatiana (2016): Impacts of artificial ocean alkalinization on the carbon cycle and climate in Earth system simulations. In Geophys. Res. Lett. DOI 10.1002/2016GL068576.

"Using the state-of-the-art emissions-driven Max-Planck-Institute Earth system model, we explore the impacts of artificial ocean alkalinization (AOA) with a scenario based on the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) framework. Addition of 114 Pmol of alkalinity to the surface ocean stabilizes atmospheric CO2 concentration to RCP4.5 levels under RCP8.5 emissions."

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11.05.2016

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New Scientist: Adding rocks to oceans could de-acidify water and save coral

"As a potential solution, Francesc Montserrat of the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research and his colleagues are exploring whether a natural mineral can mop up unwanted acid in seawater. “We’re trying to put some numbers on the table so that if politicians decide that we need to do this in 10 to 15 years’ time, the research is there and we can say, ‘here are the problems you might be dealing with’,” he says."

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03.08.2015

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the guardian: Stop burning fossil fuels now: there is no CO2 'technofix', scientists warn

Media response to Mathesius, Sabine; et al. (2015). "Researchers have demonstrated that even if a geoengineering solution to CO2 emissions could be found, it wouldn’t be enough to save the oceans."

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03.08.2015

# New Publications

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Mathesius, Sabine; et al. (2015): Long-term response of oceans to CO2 removal from the atmosphere

Mathesius, Sabine; Hofmann, Matthias; Caldeira, Ken; Schellnhuber, Hans Joachim (2015): Long-term response of oceans to CO2 removal from the atmosphere. In Nature Climate change. DOI 10.1038/nclimate2729.

"To assess the extent to which CDR might eliminate the long-term consequences of anthropogenic CO2 emissions in the marine environment, we simulate the effect of two massive CDR interventions with CO2 extraction rates of 5 GtC yr−1 and 25 GtC yr−1, respectively, while CO2 emissions follow the extended RCP8.5 pathway."

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26.05.2015

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Phys.org: Climate engineering may save coral reefs, research shows

Media responses to Kwiatkowski, Lester; et al. (2015). "Geoengineering of the climate may be the only way to save coral reefs from mass bleaching, according to new research."

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