27.11.2017

# New Publications

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Lannoy, Charles-Francois de; et al. (2017): Indirect ocean capture of atmospheric CO2. Part I. Prototype of a negative emissions technology

Lannoy, Charles-Francois de; Eisaman, Matthew D.; Jose, Arun; Karnitz, Stephen D.; DeVaul, Richard W.; Hannun, Kathy; Rivest, Jessy L.B. (2017): Indirect ocean capture of atmospheric CO 2. Part I. Prototype of a negative emissions technology. In International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control. DOI: 10.1016/j.ijggc.2017.10.007.

"We present the design, construction, characterization, and analysis of a prototype process for a novel electrochemical platform of candidate negative emissions technologies (NETs), termed indirect ocean capture. The IOC technologies remove carbon dioxide gas from the atmosphere by leveraging both air-ocean gas exchange and the pH sensitivity of the ocean’s carbonate buffer system. The system characterized in this paper enables two configurations that capture CO2 either as a pure gas or as a solid mineral."

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07.06.2017

# Media

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Russ George Blog: First ever major UN Oceans Conference is underway though it is about oceans in spin only

"The key goal of the ocean conference blatantly leaves out vital ocean restoration.Someone must speak for the oceans that need our help to restore them to historic health and abundance."

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02.06.2017

# Media

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New Scientist: Geoengineering fears make scrutiny of ocean seeding test vital

"Talk of dumping iron into the ocean off Chile to boost plankton is a return of a controversial idea that warrants questions, says Olive Heffernan"

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02.03.2017

# New Publications

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Greene, Charles H.; et al. (2017): Geoengineering, Marine Microalgae, and Climate Stabilization in the 21 st Century

Greene, Charles H.; Huntley, Mark E.; Archibald, Ian; Gerber, Léda N.; Sills, Deborah L.; Granados, Joe et al. (2017): Geoengineering, Marine Microalgae, and Climate Stabilization in the 21 st Century. In Earth's Future. DOI: 10.1002/2016EF000486.

"Here, we describe an alternative approach based on the large-scale industrial production of marine microalgae. When cultivated with proper attention to power, carbon, and nutrient sources, microalgae can be processed to produce a variety of biopetroleum products, including carbon neutral biofuels for the transportation sector and long-lived, potentially carbon-negative construction materials for the built environment."

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09.02.2017

# Media

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Inverse: Super Basic Power Plants Build Mussels

"To geochemist Greg Rau, the future looks like a seaside power plant. More specifically, it looks like a biomass combustion plant that’s actually carbon-negative because the CO2 emissions are dissolved and captured in a mix of seawater and alkaline minerals through a process called chemical weathering. Why does Rau want to see that plant erected, perhaps along the coast near UC Santa Cruz, where he works? Because he believes that energy generation can solve the problems created by energy generation. He believes that this is how you begin to turn back 150 years of carbon dioxide emissions before sea level rise engulfs the landscape and would-be power plant operators have to look for new real estate."

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17.11.2016

# Media

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Slate: Farm the Oceans to Help Stop Global Warming

Including iron fertilization. "It’s a controversial idea—but it’s already happening anyway."

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21.09.2016

# Media

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Phys.org: Nature's ocean fertiliser

"Co-author BAS Biological Oceanographer Dr Sophie Fielding says: "This finding is essential for understanding the ocean's capacity for . As atmospheric levels increase, it's essential for us to understand both the physical and biological mechanisms for fertilising the ocean with iron.""

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21.09.2016

# Media

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International Maritime Organization: More States urged to ratify the London Protocol

"Governments have been urged to ratify the London Protocol treaty which regulates the dumping of wastes at sea in order to ensure the universal application of its precautionary approach towards protection of the marine environment. [...] These include the issuing of permits for carbon dioxide sequestration in stable geological formations in the seabed to ensure permanent isolation of carbon dioxide and strong controls to regulate marine geoengineering activities - which can involve the introduction of substances or organisms into the sea in order to stimulate carbon dioxide uptake and reduce carbon dioxide in the atmosphere."

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01.09.2016

# New Publications

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Blaustein, Richard (2016): United Nations Seeks to Protect High-Seas Biodiversity

Blaustein, Richard (2016): United Nations Seeks to Protect High-Seas Biodiversity. In BioScience, biw097. DOI 10.1093/biosci/biw097

Science writer's article on biodiversity and also CE. "Beyond the life it supports, the global ocean system plays a key role in mitigating climate change. The seas have an immense natural capacity to absorb heat and carbon. Some researchers also look to the oceans for potential geoengineering schemes, such as adding iron as a way to sequester carbon."

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24.08.2016

# Media

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ABC News: Plan B for climate change: Tassie scientists looking at what to do if the worst happens

"Fertilising the oceans, painting the deserts white or sending umbrellas into orbit are some of the real things being explored by scientists as a "plan B" for dealing with climate change."

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