26.05.2017

# Media

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Nature: Iron-dumping ocean experiment sparks controversy

"Canadian foundation says its field research could boost fisheries in Chile, but researchers doubt its motives."

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03.05.2017

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News Security Beat: Consensus, Certainty, and Catastrophe: The Debate Over Ocean Iron Fertilization

"As I explore in a new Global Environmental Politics article, the fact that advocates have been able to successfully oppose a process that seems to present such clear material incentives illustrates how the language we use to describe problems can shape our understanding of their dimensions, including their significance and their risk."

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19.04.2017

# Projects

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Project: Oceanseeding

Iron fertilization project mainly on fishery. "Oceans are in decline. Projections show that fisheries could collapse by mid-century. [...] Can we still turn the tide?"

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12.04.2017

# New Publications

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Fuentes-George, Kemi (2017): Consensus, Certainty, and Catastrophe. Discourse, Governance, and Ocean Iron Fertilization

Fuentes-George, Kemi (2017): Consensus, Certainty, and Catastrophe. Discourse, Governance, and Ocean Iron Fertilization. In Global Environmental Politics 10 (2), pp. 125–143. DOI: 10.1162/GLEP_a_00404

"Crucial to their efforts was their interpretation of uncertainty: for opponents, scientific uncertainty implied possibly devastating consequences of iron dumping, which was thus best addressed with extreme caution. This normative approach ultimately shaped governance, since advocates successfully used it to lobby institutions in ocean governance to prevent carbon credits from being issued for ocean fertilization. Since these subjective understandings of certainty influenced global ocean governance, this article explains international behavior as a consequence of changing norms."

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06.03.2017

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Smithsonian: Human Pollution May Be Fertilizing The Oceans. That’s Not a Good Thing

"Phillip Boyd, a marine biogeochemist at the University of Tasmania who was not involved in the research, says the study provides "compelling evidence" that these atmospheric interactions can make emitted iron available to ocean life. However, the scientists are "sort of halfway there" when it comes to seeing how much impact manmade iron fertilization actually has, says Boyd, who is a leading researcher on ocean-climate interactions and geoengineering."

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06.03.2017

# New Publications

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Harrison, Daniel P. (2017): Global negative emissions capacity of ocean macronutrient fertilization

Harrison, Daniel P. (2017): Global negative emissions capacity of ocean macronutrient fertilization. In Environ. Res. Lett. 12 (3), p. 35001. DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/aa5ef5.

"Utilizing global datasets of oceanographic field measurements, and output from a high resolution global circulation model, the current study provides the first comprehensive assessment of the global potential for carbon sequestration from ocean macronutrient fertilization (OMF). Sufficient excess phosphate exists outside the iron limited surface ocean to support once-off sequestration of up to 3.6 Pg C by fertilization with nitrogen. Ongoing maximum capacity of nitrogen only fertilization is estimated at 0.7 ± 0.4 Pg C yr−1. "

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17.11.2016

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Slate: Farm the Oceans to Help Stop Global Warming

Including iron fertilization. "It’s a controversial idea—but it’s already happening anyway."

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24.08.2016

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ABC News: Plan B for climate change: Tassie scientists looking at what to do if the worst happens

"Fertilising the oceans, painting the deserts white or sending umbrellas into orbit are some of the real things being explored by scientists as a "plan B" for dealing with climate change."

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28.05.2016

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All About Shipping: Understanding potential impacts of marine geoengineering

"A new GESAMP working group on marine geoengineering held its first meeting at IMO Headquarters, London, this week (23-25 May). The overall objective of the Working Group (WG 41) is to better understand the potential impacts of proposed marine geoengineering techniques on the marine environment – including social and economic consequences."

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23.05.2016

# Media

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Tech Times: Iron Fertilization In The Pacific Will Not Solve Climate Change

"Iron fertilization in the Pacific is not an effective solution to climate change, a new research has revealed."

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