06.03.2017

# Media

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Smithsonian: Human Pollution May Be Fertilizing The Oceans. That’s Not a Good Thing

"Phillip Boyd, a marine biogeochemist at the University of Tasmania who was not involved in the research, says the study provides "compelling evidence" that these atmospheric interactions can make emitted iron available to ocean life. However, the scientists are "sort of halfway there" when it comes to seeing how much impact manmade iron fertilization actually has, says Boyd, who is a leading researcher on ocean-climate interactions and geoengineering."

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06.03.2017

# New Publications

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Harrison, Daniel P. (2017): Global negative emissions capacity of ocean macronutrient fertilization

Harrison, Daniel P. (2017): Global negative emissions capacity of ocean macronutrient fertilization. In Environ. Res. Lett. 12 (3), p. 35001. DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/aa5ef5.

"Utilizing global datasets of oceanographic field measurements, and output from a high resolution global circulation model, the current study provides the first comprehensive assessment of the global potential for carbon sequestration from ocean macronutrient fertilization (OMF). Sufficient excess phosphate exists outside the iron limited surface ocean to support once-off sequestration of up to 3.6 Pg C by fertilization with nitrogen. Ongoing maximum capacity of nitrogen only fertilization is estimated at 0.7 ± 0.4 Pg C yr−1. "

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17.11.2016

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Slate: Farm the Oceans to Help Stop Global Warming

Including iron fertilization. "It’s a controversial idea—but it’s already happening anyway."

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24.08.2016

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ABC News: Plan B for climate change: Tassie scientists looking at what to do if the worst happens

"Fertilising the oceans, painting the deserts white or sending umbrellas into orbit are some of the real things being explored by scientists as a "plan B" for dealing with climate change."

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28.05.2016

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All About Shipping: Understanding potential impacts of marine geoengineering

"A new GESAMP working group on marine geoengineering held its first meeting at IMO Headquarters, London, this week (23-25 May). The overall objective of the Working Group (WG 41) is to better understand the potential impacts of proposed marine geoengineering techniques on the marine environment – including social and economic consequences."

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23.05.2016

# Media

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Tech Times: Iron Fertilization In The Pacific Will Not Solve Climate Change

"Iron fertilization in the Pacific is not an effective solution to climate change, a new research has revealed."

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17.05.2016

# New Publications

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Winckler, Gisela; et al. (2016): Ocean dynamics, not dust, have controlled equatorial Pacific productivity over the past 500,000 years

Winckler, Gisela; Anderson, Robert F.; Jaccard, Samuel L.; Marcantonio, Franco (2016): Ocean dynamics, not dust, have controlled equatorial Pacific productivity over the past 500,000 years. In Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, p. 201600616–201600616. DOI 10.1073/pnas.1600616113.

On effectivity of ocean iron fertilization. "Throughout most of the equatorial Pacific, upwelling of water from the Equatorial Undercurrent supplies far more dissolved iron than is delivered by dust, by as much as two orders of magnitude. Nevertheless, recent studies have inferred that the greater supply of dust during ice ages stimulated greater utilization of nutrients within the region of upwelling on the equator, thereby contributing to the sequestration of carbon in the ocean interior. Here we present proxy records for dust and for biological productivity over the past 500 ky at three sites spanning the breadth of the equatorial Pacific Ocean to test the dust fertilization hypothesis."

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24.04.2016

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iPolitics: Canada still investigating Haida Gwaii ocean fertilizing; new experiment proposed in Chile

"The federal government is still investigating an experiment off the West Coast almost four years ago aimed at boosting salmon stocks that sparked an international outcry. Now a former director and operations officer of Haida Salmon Restoration Corp. says he wants to carry out another ocean-fertilizing exercise, this time off South America."

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20.02.2016

# New Publications

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Hauck, Judith; et al. (2016): Iron fertilisation and century-scale effects of open ocean dissolution of olivine in a simulated CO2 removal experiment

Hauck, Judith; Köhler, Peter; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter; Völker, Christoph (2016): Iron fertilisation and century-scale effects of open ocean dissolution of olivine in a simulated CO2 removal experiment. In Environ. Res. Lett. 11 (2), p. 24007–24007. DOI 10.1088/1748-9326/11/2/024007.

"Here we use a marine carbon cycle model to investigate the effects of one CDR technique: the open ocean dissolution of the iron-containing mineral olivine. We analyse the maximum CDR potential of an annual dissolution of 3 Pg olivine during the 21st century and focus on the role of the micro-nutrient iron for the biological carbon pump."

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08.02.2016

# Media

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Poly Conondrum: Use Of Iron To Boost Algae Not An Answer For Geo-Engineering

"New research suggests that fertilising oceans with iron to increase the growth of algae that absorb carbon dioxide is not the hoped-for answer to reducing global warming. One keenly-argued possible way of moderating the build-up of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere may not work, scientists have concluded."

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