01.08.2017

# New Publications

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Corry, Olaf (2017): The international politics of geoengineering. The feasibility of Plan B for tackling climate change

Corry, Olaf (2017): The international politics of geoengineering. The feasibility of Plan B for tackling climate change. In Security Dialogue 48 (4), pp. 297–315. DOI: 10.1177/0967010617704142.

"This article puts forward what it calls the ‘security hazard’ and argues that this could be a crucial factor in determining whether a technology is able, ultimately, to reduce climate risks. Ideas about global governance of geoengineering rely on heroic assumptions about state rationality and a generally pacific international system. Moreover, if in a climate engineered world weather events become something certain states can be made directly responsible for, this may also negatively affect prospects for ‘Plan A’, i.e. an effective global agreement on mitigation."

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17.11.2016

# New Publications

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Rabitz, Florian (2016): Going rogue? Scenarios for unilateral geoengineering

Rabitz, Florian (2016): Going rogue? Scenarios for unilateral geoengineering. In Futures 84, pp. 98–107. DOI 10.1016/j.futures.2016.11.001.

"I develop a conceptual framework for the study of unilateral geoengineering which distinguishes different types of actors, their capacities and decision-making contexts. Focusing on Ocean Iron Fertilization and Stratospheric Aerosol Injections, I develop several short- and long-term scenarios in which actors are conceivably both willing and able to deploy those technologies on a scale sufficient for impacting the climate system. Beyond being the first paper to develop a systematic approach to unilateral geoengineering, I show that some scenarios which stir public concern are implausible."

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23.04.2016

# Political Papers

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Engelke, Peter; Chiu, Daniel Y. (2016): Climate Change and US National Security. Past, Present, Future

Engelke, Peter; Chiu, Daniel Y. (2016): Climate Change and US National Security. Past, Present, Future. Washington, D.C: Atlantic Council.

With a chapter on CE. "However, absent mitigation, a changing climate could feasibly overwhelm adaptation efforts. Under such circumstances, a state or even an individual might turn to geoengineering (also referred to as climate engineering) in order to fashion a solution. Yet attempts to geoengineer the Earth’s ecosystems would be risky because geoengineering is an unproven field and such efforts would hold unknown consequences."

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17.04.2016

# Media

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Inverse: When Climate Change is a National Security Issue, Geoengineering is a Disaster

"It’s hard to see how you feel good about a future in which we’re forced to fundamentally alter the planet to save it from burning and drowning – but warning about that nightmare scenario might be what it takes to kick the world’s leaders into high gear."

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02.11.2015

# Media

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Lawfare: Large-Scale Geoengineering and Threats to National Security

"Large-scale geoengineering has security implications as well.  An important national security concern—unaddressed in most of the discussions about the national security concerns associated with climate change—arises from the fact that some geoengineering options are relatively inexpensive to implement."

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01.09.2015

# New Publications

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Manoussi, Vassiliki; Xepapadeas, Anastasios (2015): Cooperation and Competition in Climate Change Policies. Mitigation and Climate Engineering when Countries are Asymmetric

Manoussi, Vassiliki; Xepapadeas, Anastasios (2015): Cooperation and Competition in Climate Change Policies. Mitigation and Climate Engineering when Countries are Asymmetric. In Environ Resource Econ. DOI: 10.1007/s10640-015-9956-3

"We study a dynamic game of climate policy design in terms of emissions and solar radiation management (SRM) involving two heterogeneous countries or group of countries. Countries emit greenhouse gasses (GHGs), and can block incoming radiation by unilateral SRM activities, thus reducing global temperature. Heterogeneity is modelled in terms of the social cost of SRM, the environmental damages due to global warming, the productivity of emissions in terms of generating private benefits, the rate of impatience, and the private cost of geoengineering."

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07.08.2015

# Media

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Smithsonian: A Hotter Climate May Boost Conflict, From Shootings to Wars

On climate wars and CE. "In this episode of Generation Anthropocene, scientists explore the link between rising temperatures and aggression"

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16.07.2015

# New Publications

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Horton, Joshua B.; Reynolds, Jesse (2015): The International Politics of Climate Engineering: A Review and Prospectus for International. (forthcoming)

Horton, Joshua B.; Reynolds, Jesse (2015): The International Politics of Climate Engineering: A Review and Prospectus for International. (forthcoming). In International Studies Review.

"Thus we offer here an overview of the existing academic literature on the international politics of climate engineering, and a preliminary assessment of its strengths and lacunae. We trace several key themes in this corpus, including problem structure; the concern that climate engineering could undermine emissions cuts; the potentially ‘slippery slope’ of research and development; unilateral implementation; interstate conflict; militarization; rising tensions between industrialized and developing countries; and governance challenges and opportunities."

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17.09.2014

# Projects

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Climate CoLab: USG Leadership on MBECS Developement

"USG agencies support for Marine Bio-Energy and Carbon Sequestration (MBECS) development/demand can be achieved through established programs."

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13.09.2014

# Media

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VDI nachrichten: Climate Engineering - a Controversial Plan B

German engineerings club (VDI) newspaper on CE in general.

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