16.04.2018

# New Publications

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McLaren, Duncan P. (2018): In a broken world. Towards an ethics of repair in the Anthropocene

McLaren, Duncan P. (2018): In a broken world. Towards an ethics of repair in the Anthropocene. In The Anthropocene Review 12 (11), 205301961876721. DOI: 10.1177/2053019618767211.

"With the power to break Earth Systems comes responsibility to care for them, and arguably to repair them. Climate geoengineering is one possible approach. But repair is under-researched and underspecified in this context. In a first attempt to establish basic principles for the obligations of repair in the Anthropocene, five disciplines of repair are briefly reviewed: reconstruction of historic buildings; remediation of human bodies; restoration of ecosystems; reconfiguration of cultural materials and artifacts; and reconciliation of broken relationships. In each case ethical practices and debates are described to help identify key themes and challenges in understanding repair."

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10.04.2018

# Media

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Clean Technica: International Geoengineering Rules Are Urgently Needed, Researchers Argue

"As talk of geoengineering as a possible partial solution to anthropogenic climate change has grown over recent times, it has become an urgent need that there is a set of international rules put into place to govern such activities, some of those involved in the sector have begun arguing."

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10.04.2018

# Media

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Reuters: Rules to govern sun-dimming technology "urgently" needed - expert

"Large-scale use of sun-dimming technology could have a range of little-understood side effects, including potentially shifting Asian monsoons"

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09.04.2018

# Media

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Create: Geoengineering is controversial, but we need to talk about it

"Geoengineering is a controversial topic. But one engineer advocates for at least exploring if it could work to combat climate change – in case it becomes our only option."

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09.04.2018

# Media

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C2G2: Solar Geoengineering Research Needs Rules as Outdoor Experiments Planned, Carnegie C2G2 Initiative warns

"With only months before outdoor experimentation might start, society needs rules for research into solar geoengineering to combat climate change, warns Janos Pasztor, the head of the Carnegie Climate Geoengineering Governance Initiative (C2G2), a Carnegie Council initiative."

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28.03.2018

# New Publications

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McKinnon, Catriona (2018): Sleepwalking into lock-in? Avoiding wrongs to future people in the governance of solar radiation management research

McKinnon, Catriona (2018): Sleepwalking into lock-in? Avoiding wrongs to future people in the governance of solar radiation management research. In Environmental Politics 118 (17), pp. 1–19. DOI: 10.1080/09644016.2018.1450344.

"Arguments are advanced for two ways in which we can avoid the reckless endangerment of future people in the governance of solar radiation management (SRM) research, which could happen through lock-in to SRM deployment from research. SRM research is at an early stage, one at which the mechanisms of lock-in could start to operate. However, lock-in fit to endanger future people could be slowed or stopped through targeted governance. Governance of SRM research that does not include provisions to detect, slow, or stop lock-in fails the test of an intergenerationally adequate precautionary principle, and research governed without these provisions cannot itself be justified as a precaution against the impacts of climate change."

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26.03.2018

# New Publications

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Radunsky, Klaus (2018): The Politics and Governance of Negative Emissions Technologies

Radunsky, Klaus (2018): The Politics and Governance of Negative Emissions Technologies. In Fátima Alves, Walter Leal Filho, Ulisses Azeiteiro (Eds.): Theory and Practice of Climate Adaptation. Cham: Springer (Climate Change Management), pp. 87–104.

"The paper informs about such recently published projections that suggest that global surface temperatures will increase by approximately 5 °C (9 °F) over pre-industrial temperatures by the year 2100 and discusses options to bridge the gap to the goals specified in the Paris Agreement."

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21.03.2018

# Media

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Phys.org: We need laws on geoengineering, ASAP

"A new book coming out April 21 points out the major holes in national and international geoengineering regulation, and lays out a framework for improvement. The book, titled Climate Engineering and the Law, was co-edited by Michael Gerrard from Columbia's Sabin Center for Climate Change Law and Tracy Hester, a graduate of Columbia Law School who now teaches at the University of Houston Law Center. Gerrard is also chair of the faculty of the Earth Institute."

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12.03.2018

# New Publications

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Svoboda, Toby; et al. (2018): Climate engineering and human rights

Svoboda, Toby; Buck, Holly Jean; Suarez, Pablo (2018): Climate engineering and human rights. In Environmental Politics 366 (1), pp. 1–20. DOI: 10.1080/09644016.2018.1448575.

"In this Forum, three scholars discuss how climate engineering will pose novel human rights challenges, and may well force reconsideration of how human rights are applied as a guide to action. Following a short introduction, the first section introduces three competing approaches to human rights, arguing views which emphasize fairness or attempt to maximize satisfaction are more promising than one viewing human rights as inviolable ‘side-constraints’. The second section draws lessons from climate migration that relevant for climate engineering in terms of incorporating a human rights approach to duties, rights, and participation."

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09.03.2018

# New Publications

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Reynolds, Jesse L.; et al. (2018): Intellectual property policies for solar geoengineering

Reynolds, Jesse L.; Contreras, Jorge L.; Sarnoff, Joshua D. (2018): Intellectual property policies for solar geoengineering. In WIREs Clim Change 9 (2), e512. DOI: 10.1002/wcc.512.

"We consider some possible approaches, and recommend a bottom-up, primarily nonstate, voluntary “research commons” for patents and data that are related to solar geoengineering. This would facilitate information sharing and limit data fragmentation and trade secrecy. It would also provide an incentive for commons members to pledge to limit some forms of intellectual property acquisition and to assure access on reasonable terms, thereby limiting the need for enforcement. This should help reduce downstream barriers to innovation and to encourage the potential development of technologies at reasonable cost. Such a research commons might also catalyze the adoption of best practices in research and development."

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