14.01.2018

# New Publications

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Faran, Turaj S.; Olsson, Lennart (2018): Geoengineering. Neither economical, nor ethical—a risk–reward nexus analysis of carbon dioxide removal

Faran, Turaj S.; Olsson, Lennart (2018): Geoengineering. Neither economical, nor ethical—a risk–reward nexus analysis of carbon dioxide removal. In Int Environ Agreements 27 (12), p. 555. DOI: 10.1007/s10784-017-9383-8.

"Using the recently developed approach of risk–reward nexus (RRN) in the economics of innovation, we question the economic viability of CDR. The main argument is simple: if one uses the new framework of RRN in evaluating the innovations involved in the CDR branch of geoengineering, not only does one include more areas of risk but also one has to consider a broader base for distributing the rewards. Consequently, from RRN’s point of view, it would be less likely to find investing in CDR economically viable for the investor firms."

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02.01.2018

# Media

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Global Ethics Network: Errors of Omission, Commission, and Emission: Moral Culpability in Climate Change and Considerations of Solar Radiation Management

"We are geoengineering our world. Homo sapiens have been manipulating our immediate environments from the dawn of time; yet with the advent of the Industrial Revolution, our actions have manifested themselves on a truly planetary scale. As greenhouse gas emissions accumulate in our atmosphere, global temperatures continue to rise, and as a result, weather patterns change, sea levels rise, and both human communities and other living creatures face new challenges to survival."

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20.12.2017

# Media

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TEDx: We can control climate, but should we? The ethics of geoengineering

"More specifically, the talk focuses on Marine Cloud Brightening, an idea that explores the possibility of "brightening" clouds over the ocean to make them reflect more sunlight away from the Earth. David then encourages the audience to consider the implications of such a drastic and far-reaching solution to global warming, and whether we, as humans, have the right to intentionally perturb our Earth's natural climate systems."

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18.12.2017

# Media

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News Security Beat: Climate Engineering: Innovative Solution or Ethical Dilemma?

"“Climate engineering can be a way to build a better world,” said Katharine Mach, a senior research scientist at Stanford University during a recent virtual workshop on the promises and pitfalls of climate engineering held by the Institute on Science for Global Policy, in partnership with the Forum for Climate Geoengineering Assessment at American University, and the School of Sustainability at Arizona State University."

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11.12.2017

# New Publications

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Jinnah, Sikina; Bushey, Douglas (2017): Bringing Politics into SAI

Jinnah, Sikina; Bushey, Douglas (2017): Bringing Politics into SAI. In Ethics int. aff. 31 (04), pp. 501–506. DOI: 10.1017/S089267941700048X.

"In order to advance a neatly deductive argument, Christopher J. Preston must make a number of assumptions and framing decisions that exclude important practical points from the scope of his analysis. We do not criticize him for doing so, as these simplifications allow him to advance a concise argument about an ethically complex subject. However, as scholars of politics and law, we are interested in what this ethical argument means—and does not mean—for the messy politics of climate engineering."

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11.12.2017

# New Publications

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Lawford-Smith, Holly (2017): The Comparative Culpability of SAI and Ordinary Carbon Emissions

Lawford-Smith, Holly (2017): The Comparative Culpability of SAI and Ordinary Carbon Emissions. In Ethics int. aff. 31 (04), pp. 495–499. DOI: 10.1017/S0892679417000478.

"In his article “Carbon Emissions, Stratospheric Aerosol Injection, and Unintended Harms,” Christopher J. Preston compares the culpability of carbon emitters versus that of geoengineers deploying stratospheric aerosol injection (SAI). This comparison relies on a parallel between carbon emitters and SAI deployers that requires both to be agents. However, both are not."

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11.12.2017

# New Publications

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Preston, Christopher J. (2017): Carbon Emissions, Stratospheric Aerosol Injection, and Unintended Harms

Preston, Christopher J. (2017): Carbon Emissions, Stratospheric Aerosol Injection, and Unintended Harms. In Ethics int. aff. 31 (04), pp. 479–493. DOI: 10.1017/S0892679417000466.

"Due to the importance of intention in assigning culpability for harms, one might expect that the moral responsibility for any harms created during an attempt to reconstruct the global climate using stratospheric aerosols would be considerable. This article investigates such an expectation by making a comparison between the culpability for any unintended harms resulting from stratospheric aerosol injection and culpability for the unintended harms already taking place due to carbon emissions."

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16.11.2017

# New Publications

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Carr, Wylie; Preston, Christopher J. (2017): Skewed Vulnerabilities and Moral Corruption in Global Perspectives on Climate Engineering

Carr, Wylie; Preston, Christopher J. (2017): Skewed Vulnerabilities and Moral Corruption in Global Perspectives on Climate Engineering. In environ values 26 (6), pp. 757–777. DOI: 10.3197/096327117X15046905490371.

"The research presented in this paper was designed to build knowledge about how vulnerable populations think about climate engineering. The goal of this manuscript is to bring the ethics literature on climate engineering into dialogue with emerging social science data documenting the perspectives of vulnerable populations. The results indicate some concerns among vulnerable populations may resemble those outlined by ethicists."

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06.11.2017

# Media

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FCEA Blog: Dirty Hands and Geoengineering

"I want to suggest that this middle ground is captured by the philosophical idea, popularized by Michael Walzer, of ‘dirty hands.’ Dirty hands occur when a person must do something that violates the principles of normal morality—dirty one’s hands—in order to generate some significant good. Typical, though not unproblematic, examples would be that of a person who must torture a terrorist in order to defuse a nuclear bomb or Churchill ordering the carpet bombing of German cities during the Blitz."

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06.11.2017

# Media

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Qantara.de: Can religion help in the fight against climate change?

"Such action presents a range of risks, including potentially shifting rainfall patterns in parts of the world, scientists say. But the idea of humans deliberately playing with the earth's climate – which some believe is the prerogative of gods – could leave religious groups sceptical. Geo-engineering proposals are expected to stir the same emotional responses as other controversial scientific advances, from genetic modification to cloning, said Scharf, who now works for a body looking at governance of climate engineering."

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