18.06.2018

# New Publications

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Markus, Till; et al. (2018): An Assessment of Climate Engineering from a Buddhist Perspective

Markus, Till; Vivekānanda, Bhikkhu; Lawrence, Mark (2018): An Assessment of Climate Engineering from a Buddhist Perspective. In Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture. DOI: 10.1558/jsrnc.34831

"This article expounds a Buddhist perspective on the rapidly emerging topic of Climate Engineering, i.e. the deliberate, large-scale manipulation of the environment as a proposed means to counteract anthropogenic climate change or some of its specific aspects like global mean temperature increase. It sets the stage with two orthogonal aspects: an overview of the topic of Climate Engineering, and a broader analysis of the Buddhist perspective on mankind’s relationship with nature. Linking these together, we show that as one of the world’s major faiths, Buddhism can provide valuable insights and perspectives for the evolving global discourse on Climate Engineering methods, and that it advocates some basic requirements concerning their further development and possible future deployment."

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04.06.2018

# New Publications

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Attfield, Robin (2018): The Ethics of Geo-engineering

Attfield, Robin (2018): The Ethics of Geo-engineering. In : Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy: Philosophy Documentation Center, pp. 23–27.

"Some favor this measure as a quick and inexpensive replacement for mitigation; but its possible side-effects and lack of an exit-strategy mean that its deployment would be misguided, and that researching it might undermine determination to reach a mitigation agreement. Some forms of Carbon Dioxide Removal (seeding the oceans with iron filings to grow carbon-reducing algae) face similar objections, but others, like afforestation and Carbon Capture and Storage (itself not yet operative), comprise acceptable enhancements of current technology. Even if they do not buy time, these measures could beneficially supplement a global Climate Change agreement."

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16.04.2018

# New Publications

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McLaren, Duncan P. (2018): In a broken world. Towards an ethics of repair in the Anthropocene

McLaren, Duncan P. (2018): In a broken world. Towards an ethics of repair in the Anthropocene. In The Anthropocene Review 12 (11), 205301961876721. DOI: 10.1177/2053019618767211.

"With the power to break Earth Systems comes responsibility to care for them, and arguably to repair them. Climate geoengineering is one possible approach. But repair is under-researched and underspecified in this context. In a first attempt to establish basic principles for the obligations of repair in the Anthropocene, five disciplines of repair are briefly reviewed: reconstruction of historic buildings; remediation of human bodies; restoration of ecosystems; reconfiguration of cultural materials and artifacts; and reconciliation of broken relationships. In each case ethical practices and debates are described to help identify key themes and challenges in understanding repair."

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16.03.2018

# New Publications

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Thiele, Leslie Paul (2018): Geoengineering and sustainability

Thiele, Leslie Paul (2018): Geoengineering and sustainability. In Environmental Politics 2 (1), pp. 1–20. DOI: 10.1080/09644016.2018.1449602.

"Geoengineering is regarded by advocates as a creative and responsible technological option in the face of a climate emergency. Critics often see it as a hubristic attempt to play God, with disastrous consequences for the planet and humanity. These antipodal perspectives are represented by the ideal types of Prometheans and Gaians. Prometheans and Gaians typically talk past each other. The geoengineering debate can be made more fruitful by well articulating their respective positions and subsequently situating them in the discourse of sustainability."

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30.01.2018

# Media

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The TSEconomist: Ethics of Geoengineering Terraforma

"The technologies presented here are actually envisioned by some scientists as a way to fight global warming. These projects are assembled into a much larger field now called geoengineering. The main idea is that humanity will not be able to decrease emissions enough and that very large-scale ways of fighting global warming are all or part of the solution."

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14.01.2018

# New Publications

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Faran, Turaj S.; Olsson, Lennart (2018): Geoengineering. Neither economical, nor ethical—a risk–reward nexus analysis of carbon dioxide removal

Faran, Turaj S.; Olsson, Lennart (2018): Geoengineering. Neither economical, nor ethical—a risk–reward nexus analysis of carbon dioxide removal. In Int Environ Agreements 27 (12), p. 555. DOI: 10.1007/s10784-017-9383-8.

"Using the recently developed approach of risk–reward nexus (RRN) in the economics of innovation, we question the economic viability of CDR. The main argument is simple: if one uses the new framework of RRN in evaluating the innovations involved in the CDR branch of geoengineering, not only does one include more areas of risk but also one has to consider a broader base for distributing the rewards. Consequently, from RRN’s point of view, it would be less likely to find investing in CDR economically viable for the investor firms."

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02.01.2018

# Media

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Global Ethics Network: Errors of Omission, Commission, and Emission: Moral Culpability in Climate Change and Considerations of Solar Radiation Management

"We are geoengineering our world. Homo sapiens have been manipulating our immediate environments from the dawn of time; yet with the advent of the Industrial Revolution, our actions have manifested themselves on a truly planetary scale. As greenhouse gas emissions accumulate in our atmosphere, global temperatures continue to rise, and as a result, weather patterns change, sea levels rise, and both human communities and other living creatures face new challenges to survival."

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20.12.2017

# Media

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TEDx: We can control climate, but should we? The ethics of geoengineering

"More specifically, the talk focuses on Marine Cloud Brightening, an idea that explores the possibility of "brightening" clouds over the ocean to make them reflect more sunlight away from the Earth. David then encourages the audience to consider the implications of such a drastic and far-reaching solution to global warming, and whether we, as humans, have the right to intentionally perturb our Earth's natural climate systems."

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18.12.2017

# Media

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News Security Beat: Climate Engineering: Innovative Solution or Ethical Dilemma?

"“Climate engineering can be a way to build a better world,” said Katharine Mach, a senior research scientist at Stanford University during a recent virtual workshop on the promises and pitfalls of climate engineering held by the Institute on Science for Global Policy, in partnership with the Forum for Climate Geoengineering Assessment at American University, and the School of Sustainability at Arizona State University."

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11.12.2017

# New Publications

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Jinnah, Sikina; Bushey, Douglas (2017): Bringing Politics into SAI

Jinnah, Sikina; Bushey, Douglas (2017): Bringing Politics into SAI. In Ethics int. aff. 31 (04), pp. 501–506. DOI: 10.1017/S089267941700048X.

"In order to advance a neatly deductive argument, Christopher J. Preston must make a number of assumptions and framing decisions that exclude important practical points from the scope of his analysis. We do not criticize him for doing so, as these simplifications allow him to advance a concise argument about an ethically complex subject. However, as scholars of politics and law, we are interested in what this ethical argument means—and does not mean—for the messy politics of climate engineering."

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