16.11.2017

# New Publications

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Carr, Wylie; Preston, Christopher J. (2017): Skewed Vulnerabilities and Moral Corruption in Global Perspectives on Climate Engineering

Carr, Wylie; Preston, Christopher J. (2017): Skewed Vulnerabilities and Moral Corruption in Global Perspectives on Climate Engineering. In environ values 26 (6), pp. 757–777. DOI: 10.3197/096327117X15046905490371.

"The research presented in this paper was designed to build knowledge about how vulnerable populations think about climate engineering. The goal of this manuscript is to bring the ethics literature on climate engineering into dialogue with emerging social science data documenting the perspectives of vulnerable populations. The results indicate some concerns among vulnerable populations may resemble those outlined by ethicists."

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06.11.2017

# Media

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FCEA Blog: Dirty Hands and Geoengineering

"I want to suggest that this middle ground is captured by the philosophical idea, popularized by Michael Walzer, of ‘dirty hands.’ Dirty hands occur when a person must do something that violates the principles of normal morality—dirty one’s hands—in order to generate some significant good. Typical, though not unproblematic, examples would be that of a person who must torture a terrorist in order to defuse a nuclear bomb or Churchill ordering the carpet bombing of German cities during the Blitz."

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06.11.2017

# Media

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Qantara.de: Can religion help in the fight against climate change?

"Such action presents a range of risks, including potentially shifting rainfall patterns in parts of the world, scientists say. But the idea of humans deliberately playing with the earth's climate – which some believe is the prerogative of gods – could leave religious groups sceptical. Geo-engineering proposals are expected to stir the same emotional responses as other controversial scientific advances, from genetic modification to cloning, said Scharf, who now works for a body looking at governance of climate engineering."

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24.10.2017

# Media

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The Plastocene Blog: The Ethics of a Global Sunshade

"Earlier this month, a major international conference on climate engineering* (also known as ‘geoengineering’) wrapped up in Berlin attracting headlines around the world. Next week, I’m travelling to a smaller academic meeting on the ethics and governance of climate engineering research. Next year, two outdoor tests of climate modification technologies are scheduled to begin. The topic of climate engineering is consequential and timely enough to warrant some serious blog-space. Climate engineering is exactly the sort of technology that may characterize the Plastocene Epoch (for which this blog is named). Not only is climate engineering a big deal, the politics surrounding it is changing fast."

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23.10.2017

# Media

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Unity Colledge Online: The Ethics of Climate Engineering: A Primer for Students Pursuing an M.S. in Sustainability

"Some scientists advocate another solution: Apply new technologies to correct the harms of the old. Using technology to engineer the climate itself, these experts claim, could be the best way to ensure humanity continues to thrive and survive on this planet. The trouble is that large-scale engineering of this sort has never been attempted, and critics worry about the consequences of getting it wrong. Want a little insight into this debate? Here are some of the interesting ethical questions surrounding climate engineering."

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17.10.2017

# Media

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Whitehorsepress: Perspectives from the Front Lines of Climate Engineering

"Christopher Preston, whose co-authored article with Wylie Carr, ‘Skewed Vulnerabilities and Moral Corruption in Global Perspectives on Climate Engineering’,  is forthcoming in the next issue of Environmental Values (26.6, December 2017, pre-print access to author’s Word version available) here offers some thoughts on the controversial issue of climate engineering amid fears that, in terms of environmental justice, it could prove ‘a bad way out of a dire situation’."

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17.10.2017

# New Publications

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Clingerman, Forrest; et al. (2017): Character and Religion in Climate Engineering

Clingerman, Forrest; O'Brien, Kevin J.; Ackerman, Thomas P. (2017): Character and Religion in Climate Engineering. In Issues in Science & Technology 34 (1).

"Here we seek to point out a useful but often-neglected conversation partner that can aid these discussions: religion. Religious traditions offer concepts and vocabularies for addressing ethics and policy. Religion is formatively influential for a majority of the world’s population, but is too often ignored in discussions of the social dimensions of climate engineering. Though we are not suggesting that all ethics and policy must “be religious,” we do argue that everyone (believers and nonbelievers alike) can profit from analyzing the distinctive moral and political ideas emerging from religious traditions and worldviews. In particular, we hold that religion is important to broaden the conversation to include the moral issue of character."

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27.04.2017

# New Publications

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Lenferna, Alex; et al. (2017): Relevant Climate Response Tests for Stratospheric Aerosol Injection. A Combined Ethical and Scientific Analysis

Lenferna, Alex; Russotto, Rick; Tan, Amanda; Gardiner, Stephen; Ackerman, Thomas (2017): Relevant Climate Response Tests for Stratospheric Aerosol Injection. A Combined Ethical and Scientific Analysis. In Earth's Future. DOI: 10.1002/2016EF000504.

"In this paper, we focus on stratospheric sulfate injection as a geoengineering scheme, and provide a combined scientific and ethical analysis of climate response tests, which are a subset of outdoor tests that would seek to impose detectable and attributable changes to climate variables on global or regional scales. We assess the current state of scientific understanding on the plausibility and scalability of climate response tests. Then we delineate a minimal baseline against which to consider whether certain climate response tests would be relevant for a deployment scenario. Our analysis shows that some climate response tests, such as those attempting to detect changes in regional climate impacts, may not be deployable in time periods relevant to realistic geoengineering scenarios. This might pose significant challenges for justifying SSI deployment overall."

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10.04.2017

# New Publications

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Lawford-Smith, H.; Currie, A. (2017): Accelerating the carbon cycle: the ethics of enhanced weathering

Lawford-Smith, H.; Currie, A. (2017): Accelerating the carbon cycle: the ethics of enhanced weathering. In Biology letters 13 (4). DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2016.0859

"We argue that ethical concerns have a place alongside empirical, political and social factors as we consider how to best respond to the critical challenge that anthropogenic climate change poses. We review these concerns, considering the ethical issues that arise (or would arise) in the large-scale deployment of enhanced weathering. We discuss post-implementation scenarios, failures of collective action, the distribution of risk and externalities and redress for damage."

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17.01.2017

# Media

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Transition Studies: Ethics of Climate Change and Climate Engineering

Lecture at the University of California given by Margaret Leinen.

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