11.05.2017

# Media

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Center for Carbon Removal: Rocks: the next big climate solution?

"A small community of researchers increasingly see the potential for certain types of rocks to offer a cost-effective carbon capture and storage (CCS) approach that could one day help reverse climate change. Yes: plain, old rocks. Here is the story behind the potential CCS strategy hiding under our feet."

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10.04.2017

# New Publications

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Kantola, Ilsa B.; et al. (2017): Potential of global croplands and bioenergy crops for climate change mitigation through deployment for enhanced weathering

Kantola, Ilsa B.; Masters, Michael D.; Beerling, David J.; Long, Stephen P.; DeLucia, Evan H. (2017): Potential of global croplands and bioenergy crops for climate change mitigation through deployment for enhanced weathering. In Biology letters 13 (4). DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2016.0714 

"Enhanced weathering (EW) in agricultural soils—applying crushed silicate rock as a soil amendment—is a method for combating global climate change while increasing nutrient availability to plants. EW uses land that is already producing food and fuel to sequester carbon (C), and reduces N2O loss through pH buffering. As biofuel use increases, EW in bioenergy crops offers the opportunity to sequester CO2 while reducing fossil fuel combustion. Uncertainties remain in the long-term effects and global implications of large-scale efforts to directly manipulate Earth's atmospheric CO2 composition, but EW in agricultural lands is an opportunity to employ these soils to sequester atmospheric C while benefitting crop production and the global climate."

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10.04.2017

# New Publications

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Edwards, David P.; et al. (2017): Climate change mitigation: potential benefits and pitfalls of enhanced rock weathering in tropical agriculture

Edwards, David P.; Lim, Felix; James, Rachael H.; Pearce, Christopher R.; Scholes, Julie; Freckleton, Robert P.; Beerling, David J. (2017): Climate change mitigation: potential benefits and pitfalls of enhanced rock weathering in tropical agriculture. In Biology letters 13 (4). DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2016.0715

"We review the potential for deployment of enhanced weathering (EW), via the application of crushed reactive silicate rocks (such as basalt), on over 680 million hectares of tropical agricultural and tree plantations to offset fossil fuel CO2 emissions. Warm tropical climates and productive crops will substantially enhance weathering rates, with potential co-benefits including decreased soil acidification and increased phosphorus supply promoting higher crop yields sparing forest for conservation, and reduced cultural eutrophication."

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10.04.2017

# New Publications

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Lawford-Smith, H.; Currie, A. (2017): Accelerating the carbon cycle: the ethics of enhanced weathering

Lawford-Smith, H.; Currie, A. (2017): Accelerating the carbon cycle: the ethics of enhanced weathering. In Biology letters 13 (4). DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2016.0859

"We argue that ethical concerns have a place alongside empirical, political and social factors as we consider how to best respond to the critical challenge that anthropogenic climate change poses. We review these concerns, considering the ethical issues that arise (or would arise) in the large-scale deployment of enhanced weathering. We discuss post-implementation scenarios, failures of collective action, the distribution of risk and externalities and redress for damage."

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10.04.2017

# New Publications

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Taylor, Lyla L.; et al. (2017): Simulating carbon capture by enhanced weathering with croplands: an overview of key processes highlighting areas of future model development

Taylor, Lyla L.; Beerling, David J.; Quegan, Shaun; Banwart, Steven A. (2017): Simulating carbon capture by enhanced weathering with croplands: an overview of key processes highlighting areas of future model development. In Biology letters 13 (4). DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2016.0868

"Here, we review the processes leading to soil acidification in croplands and how the soil weathering CO2 sink is represented in models. Mathematical models capturing the dominant processes and human interventions governing cropland soil chemistry and GHG emissions neglect weathering, while most weathering models neglect agricultural processes. We discuss current approaches to modelling EW and highlight several classes of model having the potential to simulate EW in croplands."

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10.04.2017

# New Publications

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Meysman, Filip J. R.; Montserrat, Francesc (2017): Negative CO2 emissions via enhanced silicate weathering in coastal environments

Meysman, Filip J. R.; Montserrat, Francesc (2017): Negative CO2 emissions via enhanced silicate weathering in coastal environments. In Biology letters 13 (4). DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2016.0905

"Enhanced silicate weathering (ESW) proposes to exploit the natural process of mineral weathering for the removal of CO2 from the atmosphere. Here, we discuss the potential of applying ESW in coastal environments as a climate change mitigation option. By deliberately introducing fast-weathering silicate minerals onto coastal sediments, alkalinity is released into the overlying waters, thus creating a coastal CO2 sink. Compared with other NETs, coastal ESW has the advantage that it counteracts ocean acidification, does not interfere with terrestrial land use and can be directly integrated into existing coastal management programmes with existing (dredging) technology."

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10.04.2017

# New Publications

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Pidgeon, Nick F.; Spence, Elspeth (2017): Perceptions of enhanced weathering as a biological negative emissions option

Pidgeon, Nick F.; Spence, Elspeth (2017): Perceptions of enhanced weathering as a biological negative emissions option. In Biology letters 13 (4). DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2017.0024

"This paper addresses the social acceptability of enhanced weathering, a technology that would involve spreading silicate particles over terrestrial surfaces in order to boost the biological processes that currently sequester CO2 as part of the earth's natural carbon cycle. We present the first exploration of British attitudes towards enhanced weathering, using an online survey (n = 935) of a representative quota sample of the public. Baseline awareness of weathering was extremely low."

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10.04.2017

# New Publications

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Beerling, David J. (2017): Enhanced rock weathering: biological climate change mitigation with co-benefits for food security?

Beerling, David J. (2017): Enhanced rock weathering: biological climate change mitigation with co-benefits for food security? In Biology letters 13 (4). DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2017.0149

"The papers in this mini-series address an underdeveloped NET, enhanced rock weathering, with a particular focus on croplands managed for food production and bioenergy. Weathering is a slow natural process removing CO2 from the atmosphere on long timescales of a million years or more. During weathering, silicate rocks are chemically broken down to release base cations and generate bicarbonate, which is ultimately transferred to the oceans leading to carbonate precipitation on the seafloor."

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11.06.2015

# New Publications

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Renforth, P.; et al. (2015): The dissolution of olivine added to soil: Implications for enhanced weathering

Renforth, P.; Pogge von Strandmann, P.A.E.; Henderson, G. M. (2015): The dissolution of olivine added to soil: Implications for enhanced weathering. In Applied Geochemistry 61, pp. 109–118. DOI 10.1016/j.apgeochem.2015.05.016.

"Here we present results from laboratory flow-through dissolution experiments which seek to bridge this observational discrepancy by using columns of soil returned to the laboratory from a field site. We constrain the dissolution rate of olivine added to the top of one of these columns, while maintaining much of the complexity inherent in the soil environment."

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28.07.2014

# Media

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Popular Science: Rogue Geoengineering Project May Have Increased Salmon Numbers

Response to Batten, S. D.; Gower, J. F. R. (2014). "The salmon population in an area dosed with iron has doubled."

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