23.02.2018

# Media

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New Scientist: Rock dusting on farms could cool the climate, so let’s try it

"Crushed basalt applied to agricultural land could soak up billions of tons of carbon dioxide and boost crops. Let's put it to the test, says Olive Heffernan"

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20.02.2018

# Media

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Technology Networks: Adding Crushed Rock to Farmland Could Reduce CO2 and Protect Crops from Disease

"Farming crops with crushed rocks could help to improve global food security and capture CO2 from the atmosphere, a new study has found. The pioneering research by scientists at the University of Sheffield together with international colleagues suggests that adding fast-reacting silicate rocks to croplands could capture CO2 and give increased protection from pests and diseases while restoring soil structure and fertility."

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20.02.2018

# New Publications

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Beerling, David J.; et al. (2018): Farming with crops and rocks to address global climate, food and soil security

Beerling, David J.; Leake, Jonathan R.; Long, Stephen P.; Scholes, Julie D.; Ton, Jurriaan; Nelson, Paul N. et al. (2018): Farming with crops and rocks to address global climate, food and soil security. In Nature Plants 327, p. 810. DOI: 10.1038/s41477-018-0108-y.

"Managed croplands worldwide are already equipped for frequent rock dust additions to soils, making rapid adoption at scale feasible, and the potential benefits could generate financial incentives for widespread adoption in the agricultural sector. However, there are still obstacles to be surmounted. Audited field-scale assessments of the efficacy of CO2 capture are urgently required together with detailed environmental monitoring. A cost-effective way to meet the rock requirements for CO2 removal must be found, possibly involving the recycling of silicate waste materials. Finally, issues of public perception, trust and acceptance must also be addressed."

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20.02.2018

# Media

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Carbon Brief: Guest post: How ‘enhanced weathering’ could slow climate change and boost crop yields

"Achieving the Paris Agreement goals of keeping global warming to “well below” 2C, or to 1.5C, above pre-industrial levels will require rapid decarbonisation of human society. But national commitments to rein in greenhouse gas emissions are currently insufficient to meet these agreed limits. It is increasingly likely that “negative emissions”, or “carbon dioxide removal”, technologies will be needed to take up the slack."

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05.02.2018

# New Publications

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Griffioen, Jasper (2017): Enhanced weathering of olivine in seawater. The efficiency as revealed by thermodynamic scenario analysis

Griffioen, Jasper (2017): Enhanced weathering of olivine in seawater. The efficiency as revealed by thermodynamic scenario analysis. In The Science of the Total Environment 575, pp. 536–544. DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.09.008.

"This study aimed to characterise how olivine can weather in seawater, to elucidate the role of secondary precipitation and to ascertain the efficiency in terms of molar CO2 removal per mole of olivine dissolution. Geochemical thermodynamic equilibrium modelling was used, which considered both the variable mineralogical composition of olivine and the kinds of secondary precipitates that may be formed. The advantage is that such an approach is independent from local or regional factors as temperature, related kinetics, mineralogy, etc. The results show that the efficiency falls when secondary precipitates are formed."

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11.05.2017

# Media

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Center for Carbon Removal: Rocks: the next big climate solution?

"A small community of researchers increasingly see the potential for certain types of rocks to offer a cost-effective carbon capture and storage (CCS) approach that could one day help reverse climate change. Yes: plain, old rocks. Here is the story behind the potential CCS strategy hiding under our feet."

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10.04.2017

# New Publications

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Kantola, Ilsa B.; et al. (2017): Potential of global croplands and bioenergy crops for climate change mitigation through deployment for enhanced weathering

Kantola, Ilsa B.; Masters, Michael D.; Beerling, David J.; Long, Stephen P.; DeLucia, Evan H. (2017): Potential of global croplands and bioenergy crops for climate change mitigation through deployment for enhanced weathering. In Biology letters 13 (4). DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2016.0714 

"Enhanced weathering (EW) in agricultural soils—applying crushed silicate rock as a soil amendment—is a method for combating global climate change while increasing nutrient availability to plants. EW uses land that is already producing food and fuel to sequester carbon (C), and reduces N2O loss through pH buffering. As biofuel use increases, EW in bioenergy crops offers the opportunity to sequester CO2 while reducing fossil fuel combustion. Uncertainties remain in the long-term effects and global implications of large-scale efforts to directly manipulate Earth's atmospheric CO2 composition, but EW in agricultural lands is an opportunity to employ these soils to sequester atmospheric C while benefitting crop production and the global climate."

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10.04.2017

# New Publications

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Edwards, David P.; et al. (2017): Climate change mitigation: potential benefits and pitfalls of enhanced rock weathering in tropical agriculture

Edwards, David P.; Lim, Felix; James, Rachael H.; Pearce, Christopher R.; Scholes, Julie; Freckleton, Robert P.; Beerling, David J. (2017): Climate change mitigation: potential benefits and pitfalls of enhanced rock weathering in tropical agriculture. In Biology letters 13 (4). DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2016.0715

"We review the potential for deployment of enhanced weathering (EW), via the application of crushed reactive silicate rocks (such as basalt), on over 680 million hectares of tropical agricultural and tree plantations to offset fossil fuel CO2 emissions. Warm tropical climates and productive crops will substantially enhance weathering rates, with potential co-benefits including decreased soil acidification and increased phosphorus supply promoting higher crop yields sparing forest for conservation, and reduced cultural eutrophication."

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10.04.2017

# New Publications

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Lawford-Smith, H.; Currie, A. (2017): Accelerating the carbon cycle: the ethics of enhanced weathering

Lawford-Smith, H.; Currie, A. (2017): Accelerating the carbon cycle: the ethics of enhanced weathering. In Biology letters 13 (4). DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2016.0859

"We argue that ethical concerns have a place alongside empirical, political and social factors as we consider how to best respond to the critical challenge that anthropogenic climate change poses. We review these concerns, considering the ethical issues that arise (or would arise) in the large-scale deployment of enhanced weathering. We discuss post-implementation scenarios, failures of collective action, the distribution of risk and externalities and redress for damage."

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10.04.2017

# New Publications

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Taylor, Lyla L.; et al. (2017): Simulating carbon capture by enhanced weathering with croplands: an overview of key processes highlighting areas of future model development

Taylor, Lyla L.; Beerling, David J.; Quegan, Shaun; Banwart, Steven A. (2017): Simulating carbon capture by enhanced weathering with croplands: an overview of key processes highlighting areas of future model development. In Biology letters 13 (4). DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2016.0868

"Here, we review the processes leading to soil acidification in croplands and how the soil weathering CO2 sink is represented in models. Mathematical models capturing the dominant processes and human interventions governing cropland soil chemistry and GHG emissions neglect weathering, while most weathering models neglect agricultural processes. We discuss current approaches to modelling EW and highlight several classes of model having the potential to simulate EW in croplands."

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