02.05.2016

# New Publications

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Haszeldine, R. Stuart (2016): Can CCS and NET enable the continued use of fossil carbon fuels after CoP21?

Haszeldine, R. Stuart (2016): Can CCS and NET enable the continued use of fossil carbon fuels after CoP21? In ECOPOL 32 (2), pp. 304–322. DOI 10.1093/oxrep/grw013.

"Both CCS and negative emission technology (NET) are now required to manage the carbon stock in earth’s atmosphere and oceans. All components of CCS are operationally proven secure at the industrial scale. Fifteen CCS projects operate globally; seven are under construction. CCS systems increase electricity prices, to about £100/MWhr."

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14.03.2016

# New Publications

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Lockley, Andrew (2016): Licence to chill. Building a legitimate authorisation process for commercial SRM operations

Lockley, Andrew (2016): Licence to chill. Building a legitimate authorisation process for commercial SRM operations. In Environmental Law Review 18 (1), pp. 25–40. DOI 10.1177/1461452916630082.

"It has been suggested that SRM could be carried out by commercially motivated actors. [...] We discuss the need for a two-pronged regulatory approach, encompassing first legal and corporate regulation and second, scientific and technical regulation. In conclusion, we identify differing regulatory requirements, according to whether the intended effect on the climate system of the SRM industry, or of individual firms, can be regarded as de minimis."

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12.02.2016

# Media

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Academic Minute. Garth Heutel, Georgia State University – Solar Geoengineering

"Garth Heutel, assistant professor of economics at Georgia State University, explains his research into the benefits and risks of solar geoengineering."

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01.02.2016

# New Publications

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Tol, Richard S. J. (2016): Distributional Implications of Geoengineering

Tol, Richard S. J. (2016): Distributional Implications of Geoengineering. Department of Economics, University of Sussex (Working Paper, 8316).

"Geoengineering is a private good with externalities. Individual countries, and indeed medium-sized organizations and companies, can geoengineer unilaterally and impose their preferred climate on others. In this paper, I use the FUND model to illustrate the implications, comparing and contrasting efficient, optimal, and equitable solutions to emission reduction and geoengineering."

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16.01.2016

# New Publications

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Sanchez, Daniel L.; Kammen, Daniel M. (2016): A commercialization strategy for carbon-negative energy

Sanchez, Daniel L.; Kammen, Daniel M. (2016): A commercialization strategy for carbon-negative energy. In Nat. Energy 1 (1), p. 15002–15002. DOI 10.1038/NENERGY.2015.2.

"Climate change mitigation requires gigatonne-scale CO2 removal technologies, yet few examples exist beyond niche markets. The flexibility of thermochemical conversion of biomass and fossil energy, coupled with carbon capture and storage, offers a route to commercializing carbon-negative energy."

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16.12.2015

# Media

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FCEA Blog: Cost-Benefit Analysis of Solar Geoengineering

By Juan Moreno-Cruz, and Soheil Shayegh. "Solar geoengineering (SGE) offers the possibility of offsetting greenhouse-gas-induced temperature increases by reducing incoming solar radiation. Its key advantages are 1) it is fast. Unlike emissions reductions, which can take decades to bear results, SGE can reduce global temperatures nearly instantaneously. 2) it is cheap. SGE can potentially reduce temperatures at costs that are several orders of magnitude lower compared to abatement – this has been called “the incredible economics of geoengineering”."

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05.12.2015

# Media

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The Conversation: Can solar geoengineering be part of responsible climate policy?

"There are a number of ideas for how people might intentionally alter the planet’s climate system – an approach called geoengineering. One of the most frequently discussed ideas is solar geoengineering, blocking some of sun’s energy by, for example, injecting tiny particles called sulfate aerosols into the atmosphere. But solar geoengineeering remains a controversial method of addressing climate change."

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05.12.2015

# Media

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Angle Journal: Solar Radiation Management Can Only Work if it Works for the Poor

"There remains the possibility that SRM could complement mitigation and adaptation in the fight against climate change, but not without simultaneous increases in resources for research and informed debate that is grounded in the needs of those most affected by climate change right now."

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19.11.2015

# New Publications

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Heutel, Garth; et al. (2015): Climate Engineering Economics

Heutel, Garth; Moreno-Cruz, Juan; Ricke, Katharine (2015): Climate Engineering Economics. Cambridge, MA (NBER Working Paper Series, 21711).

"This article reviews and evaluates the nascent literature on the economics of climate engineering. [...] We review the science and engineering characteristics of these technologies and analyze the implications of those characteristics on economic policy design. We discuss optimal policy and carbon price, inter-regional and inter-generational equity issues, strategic interaction in the design of international environmental agreements, and the sources of risk and uncertainty surrounding these technologies."

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09.11.2015

# New Publications

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Diakun, Aladdin Tingling (2015): Clearing the Air on 'Geoengineering' and Intellectual Property Rights

Diakun, Aladdin Tingling (2015): Clearing the Air on 'Geoengineering' and Intellectual Property Rights. Towards a framework approach. (Master Thesis)

"To untangle the issue, this paper focuses on patents and trade secrets as the most relevant categories of intellectual property, and develops a framework within which to situate IP-related concerns, specifically as related to direct air capture, ocean iron fertilization, and stratospheric aerosol spraying. The paper shows that there is no a priori 'yes or no' answer to the question of whether IPRs are desirable and appropriate for 'geoengineering.' Rather, the question of whether they ought to be encouraged or discouraged is highly conditional. "

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