05.03.2017

# New Publications

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Minx, Jan C.; et al. (2017): Fast growing research on negative emissions

Minx, Jan C.; Lamb, William F.; Callaghan, Max W.; Bornmann, Lutz; Fuss, Sabine (2017): Fast growing research on negative emissions. In Environ. Res. Lett. 12 (3), p. 35007. DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/aa5ee5

"In this paper we use scientometric methods and topic modelling to identify and characterize the available evidence on NETs as recorded in the Web of Science. We find that the development of the literature on NETs has started later than for climate change as a whole, but proceeds more quickly by now. A total number of about 2900 studies have accumulated between 1991 and 2016 with almost 500 new publications in 2016."

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17.01.2017

# New Publications

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Curvelo, Paula; Guimarães Pereira, Ângela (2016): Geoengineering: Reflections on Current Debates

Curvelo, Paula; Guimarães Pereira, Ângela (2016): Geoengineering: Reflections on Current Debates. In: Ana Delgado (Hg.): Technoscience and Citizenship. Ethics and Governance in the Digital Society, Bd. 17. Cham: Springer Verlag (The International Library of Ethics, Law and Technology), S. 163–184.

"In this paper we propose to investigate the current debates on geoengineering, here considered as an illustrative metaphor of particular technoscientific promises and ‘techno-fix’ narratives that are emerging in our society."

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09.10.2016

# New Publications

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Fairbrother, Malcolm (2016): Geoengineering, moral hazard, and trust in climate science. Evidence from a survey experiment in Britain

Fairbrother, Malcolm (2016): Geoengineering, moral hazard, and trust in climate science. Evidence from a survey experiment in Britain. In Climatic Change. DOI 10.1007/s10584-016-1818-7.

"This paper presents the results of survey experiments testing whether hearing about solar radiation management (SRM) affects people’s support for taxing polluting energy and/or their trust in climate science. For a nationally representative sample of respondents in Britain, I found that receiving a brief introduction to SRM had no impact on most people’s willingness to pay taxes, nor on their trust in climate science."

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06.10.2016

# New Publications

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Burns, Elizabeth T.; et al. (2016): What do people think when they think about solar geoengineering? A review of empirical social science literature, and prospects for future reseach

Burns, Elizabeth T.; Flegal, Jane A.; Keith, David W.; Mahajan, Aseem; Tingley, Dustin; Wagner, Gernot (2016): What do people think when they think about solar geoengineering? A review of empirical social science literature, and prospects for future research. In Earth’s Future, n/a‐n/a. DOI 10.1002/2016EF000461.

"In reflecting on the past decade of research, we review around thirty studies investigating public familiarity with, and views about, solar geoengineering. A number of recurring patterns emerge: (1) general unfamiliarity with geoengineering among publics; (2) the importance of artifice versus naturalness; (3) some conditional support for certain kinds of research; and (4) nuanced findings on the ‘moral hazard’ and ‘reverse moral hazard’ hypotheses, with empirical support for each appearing under different circumstances and populations."

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01.06.2016

# New Publications

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Elliott, Kevin C. (2016): Climate Geoengineering

Elliott, Kevin C. (2016): Climate Geoengineering. In Sven Ove Hansson, Gertrude Hirsch Hadorn (Eds.): Argumentative turn in policy analysis. Reasoning about uncertainty, vol. 10. [S.l.]: Springer (Logic, Argumentation & Reasoning), pp. 305–324.

"Instead, debates about climate geoengineering incorporate a wide variety of issues that can be fruitfully addressed using argumentative analysis. These include conceptual questions about how to characterize and frame the decision problem; ethical questions about the values and principles that should guide decision makers; and procedural questions about how to make decisions about climate geoengineering in a fair, legitimate manner."

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08.06.2015

# New Publications

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Kreuter; Judith (2015): Technofix, Plan B or Ultima Ratio? A Review of the Social Science Literature on Climate Engineering Technologies

Kreuter; Judith (2015): Technofix, Plan B or Ultima Ratio? A Review of the Social Science Literature on Climate Engineering Technologies. Oxford University, Institute of Science, Innovation and Society (Occasional Paper Series, 2).

"The aim of this paper is to discover which representations of climate engineering (CE) are considered most salient, and how they are approached. The author argues that the understanding of climate engineering as (part of) a solution to the political problem of climate change is the dominant frame in the discourse on the issue."

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01.05.2015

# New Publications

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Harnisch, Sebastian; et al. (2015): From ‘Go Slow’ to ‘Gung Ho’? Climate Engineering Discourses in the UK, the US, and Germany

Harnisch, Sebastian; Uther, Stephanie; Böttcher, Miranda (2015): From ‘Go Slow’ to ‘Gung Ho’? Climate Engineering Discourses in the UK, the US, and Germany. In Global Environmental Politics 15 (2), pp. 57–78. DOI 10.1162/GLEP_a_00298.

"To show the process of legitimacy formation of CE research, we traced the development of argumentatvie structures in national discourses by means of qualitative and quantitative structures in national discourses by means of qualitative and quantitative case studies. We complemented arguments previously identified in CE literature and identified key actors connected by their joint utilization of certain arguments and narratives."

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20.04.2015

# Media

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Finnish Meteorological Institute: Solar radiation management – last resort for mitigating future climate change?

Press release. "As a result, more sunlight would reflect back to space before reaching the planet's surface, and thus the surface would cool. Could SRM be a useful method to mitigate global warming?"

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17.11.2014

# Media

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The Independent: Can seashells save the world?

"Coccolithophores are microscopic marine plants that convert carbon dioxide into chalk. It was thought that rising C02 and more acid oceans would curb their activity. Instead they are booming – and fighting global warming."

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04.11.2014

# Calls & events

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Job: Postdoctor in Environmental Change, Linkoping

Deadline 03.12.2014

"The research task involves social science and/or humanistic research into new and emerging technologies related to climate change. The postdoctoral researcher will work within the Linköping University Climate Engineering Programme’ (LUCE, www.cspr.se/forskning/luce), which analyses policy, science and communication related to climate engineering (geoengineering) technologies, but the research task may also be directed towards low-carbon energy technologies."

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