09.11.2017

# Media

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McClatchy: We can brighten clouds to reflect heat and reduce global warming. But should we?

"“We think SRN could buy time for other (carbon-reduction) measures to be put in place,” said Philip J. Rasch, chief climate scientist for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington."

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08.11.2017

# New Publications

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Ahlm, Lars; et al. (2017): Marine cloud brightening – as effective without clouds

Ahlm, Lars; Jones, Andy; Stjern, Camilla W.; Muri, Helene; Kravitz, Ben; Kristjánsson, Jón Egill (2017): Marine cloud brightening – as effective without clouds. In Atmos. Chem. Phys 17 (21), pp. 13071–13087. DOI: 10.5194/acp-17-13071-2017.

"Here we present results from coordinated simulations with three Earth system models (ESMs) participating in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) G4sea-salt experiment. Injection rates of accumulation-mode sea spray aerosol particles over ocean between 30° N and 30° S are set in each model to generate a global-mean effective radiative forcing (ERF) of −2.0 W m−2 at the top of the atmosphere. We find that the injection increases the cloud droplet number concentration in lower layers, reduces the cloud-top effective droplet radius, and increases the cloud optical depth over the injection area."

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17.10.2017

# New Publications

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Clingerman, Forrest; et al. (2017): Character and Religion in Climate Engineering

Clingerman, Forrest; O'Brien, Kevin J.; Ackerman, Thomas P. (2017): Character and Religion in Climate Engineering. In Issues in Science & Technology 34 (1).

"Here we seek to point out a useful but often-neglected conversation partner that can aid these discussions: religion. Religious traditions offer concepts and vocabularies for addressing ethics and policy. Religion is formatively influential for a majority of the world’s population, but is too often ignored in discussions of the social dimensions of climate engineering. Though we are not suggesting that all ethics and policy must “be religious,” we do argue that everyone (believers and nonbelievers alike) can profit from analyzing the distinctive moral and political ideas emerging from religious traditions and worldviews. In particular, we hold that religion is important to broaden the conversation to include the moral issue of character."

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28.08.2017

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University of Melbourne: The Great Barrier Reef is dying. Is it time to engineer the climate?

"In the absence of a sudden and rapid reduction in global greenhouse gas emissions, recovery options are few and tenuous.  In fact, that’s a generous assessment.  We have basically reached the point where anything that provides a glimmer of hope is “worth a crack”. One such proposal is to cool the ocean around the reef by “brightening” clouds overhead.  Modelling and measurements indicate that increasing cloud cover and density would reduce water temperatures around the reef, although whether the effect is sufficient to arrest coral bleaching is uncertain."

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19.08.2017

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the guardian: Silver linings: the climate scientist who records cloud behaviour

"Clouds cool the planet by reflecting solar energy back to space and also trap heat and radiate it back to Earth. In a Yale Environment 360 interview, physicist Kate Marvel discusses the double-edged effect clouds have on rising temperatures."

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17.08.2017

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Yale Environment 360: Investigating the Enigma of Clouds and Climate Change

"With geoengineering, I’m always very concerned because if I want to do an experiment on human subjects, as a university researcher, I have to go in front of a review board and convince them that all of my human subjects have given informed consent to participate in this experiment. And with a lot of geo-engineering experiments, I worry about how that consent is going to be obtained."

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07.08.2017

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Xinhua: To cool planet, researchers propose spraying particles into marine clouds

"A group of researchers at the University of Washington (UW) is investigating the idea of marine cloud brightening as a strategy to offset global warming. As a short-term measure for a possible future emergency situation, the strategy involves spraying saltwater into clouds above oceans to boost their capacity to reflect sunlight. In a paper published in the journal Earth's Future, two UW researchers, including lead author Rob Wood, a professor of atmospheric sciences, say small-scale tests of marine cloud brightening would also help answer scientific questions about clouds and aerosols' possible role to help cool the planet."

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03.08.2017

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Anthropocene: Scientists Make the Case for Spraying Saltwater Into Clouds to Help Cool the Planet

"In a new study, researchers at the University of Washington make the case for a geoengineering method known as marine cloud brightening. The technique calls for spraying saltwater into low-lying marine clouds, where they help create more clouds that reflect heat back into space. The UW scientists say in the journal Earth’s Future that conducting small, controlled marine cloud brightening experiments would provide unprecedented data to understand the effects of aerosols on cloud formation and the resulting reflection of sunlight."

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27.07.2017

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GlobalSpec: A Geoengineering Technique Called Cloud Brightening Could Slow Global Warming

"A new University of Washington study focuses on the idea of marine cloud brightening, which is being studied by a UW group as a strategy to offset global warming. The strategy is to spray saltwater into the air to make marine clouds reflect more incoming solar rays. Small-scale tests of marine cloud brightening could help answer many scientific questions about clouds and aerosols. The goal for these geoengineering tests would follow the recommendations from U.S. National Academies of Sciences’ 2015 that said any tests of geoengineering also yields scientific benefits."

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18.06.2017

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The National UEA: Sunny outlook for rain-inducing cloud seeding, researchers forecast

"In Britain, projects have analysed whether cloud seeding could help to lower the temperatures of the sea surface, which could make hurricanes less powerful by starving them of energy. Perhaps more outlandish is the suggestion that cloud seeding could limit global warming. Among those interested in producing clouds that could reflect sunlight is Stephen Salter, emeritus professor of engineering design at the University of Edinburgh."

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