18.06.2017

# Media

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The National UEA: Sunny outlook for rain-inducing cloud seeding, researchers forecast

"In Britain, projects have analysed whether cloud seeding could help to lower the temperatures of the sea surface, which could make hurricanes less powerful by starving them of energy. Perhaps more outlandish is the suggestion that cloud seeding could limit global warming. Among those interested in producing clouds that could reflect sunlight is Stephen Salter, emeritus professor of engineering design at the University of Edinburgh."

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14.06.2017

# New Publications

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Lauvset, Siv K.; et al. (2017): Climate engineering and the ocean. Effects on biogeochemistry and primary production

Lauvset, Siv K.; Tjiputra, Jerry; Muri, Helene (2017): Climate engineering and the ocean. Effects on biogeochemistry and primary production. In: Biogeosciences Discuss., S. 1–36. DOI: 10.5194/bg-2017-235

"Here we use an Earth System Model with interactive biogeochemistry to project future ocean biogeochemistry impacts from large-scale deployment of three different radiation management (RM) climate engineering (also known as geoengineering) methods: stratospheric aerosol injection (SAI), marine sky brightening (MSB), and cirrus cloud thinning (CCT). We apply RM such that the change in radiative forcing in the RCP8.5 emission scenario is reduced to the change in radiative forcing in the RCP4.5 scenario. The resulting global mean sea surface temperatures in the RM experiments are comparable to those in RCP4.5, but there are regional differences."

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02.06.2017

# New Publications

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Ahlm, Lars; et al. (2017): Marine cloud brightening – as effective without clouds

"Here we present results from coordinated simulations with three Earth system models (ESMs) participating in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) G4sea-salt experiment. Injection rates of accumulation mode sea spray aerosol particles over ocean between 30° N and 30° S are set in each model to generate a global-mean effective radiative forcing (ERF) of −2.0 W m−2 at the top of atmosphere. We find that the injection increases the cloud droplet number concentration in lower layers, reduces the cloud-top effective droplet radius, and increases the cloud optical depth over the injection area."

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21.04.2017

# Media

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MIT Technology Review: Scientists Consider Brighter Clouds to Preserve the Great Barrier Reef

"As bleaching devastates the critical ecosystem for a second year in a row, marine scientists are getting desperate."

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19.11.2016

# New Publications

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Quaas, Johannes; et al. (2016): Regional climate engineering by radiation management: Prerequisites and prospects

Quaas, Johannes; Quaas, Martin F.; Boucher, Olivier; Rickels, Wilfried (2016): Regional climate engineering by radiation management: Prerequisites and prospects. In Earth’s Future. DOI 10.1002/2016EF000440.

"In this paper, we discuss the idea that RM can be differentiated and scaled in several dimensions with potential objectives being to influence a certain climate parameter in a specific region. Some short-lived climate forcers (e.g., tropospheric aerosols) exhibit strong geographical and temporal variability, potentially leading to limited- area climate responses. Marine cloud brightening and thinning or dissolution of cirrus clouds could be operated at a rather local scale."

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25.05.2016

# New Publications

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Kravitz, Ben; et al. (2016): Geoengineering as a design problem

Kravitz, Ben; MacMartin, Douglas G.; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J. (2016): Geoengineering as a design problem. In Earth Syst. Dynam. 7 (2), pp. 469–497. DOI 10.5194/esd-7-469-2016.

"Here we turn this approach around by first choosing example climate objectives and then designing a strategy to meet those objectives in climate models. There are four essential criteria for designing a strategy: (i) an explicit specification of the objectives, (ii) defining what climate forcing agents to modify so the objectives are met, (iii) a method for managing uncertainties, and (iv) independent verification of the strategy in an evaluation model."

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26.12.2015

# New Publications

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DeMott, Paul J.; et al. (2015): Sea spray aerosol as a unique source of ice nucleating particles

DeMott, Paul J.; Hill, Thomas C. J.; McCluskey, Christina S.; Prather, Kimberly A.; Collins, Douglas B.; Sullivan, Ryan C. et al. (2015): Sea spray aerosol as a unique source of ice nucleating particles. In PNAS. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1514034112.

"Ice nucleating particles (INPs) are vital for ice initiation in, and precipitation from, mixed-phase clouds. A source of INPs from oceans within sea spray aerosol (SSA) emissions has been suggested in previous studies but remained unconfirmed. Here, we show that INPs are emitted using real wave breaking in a laboratory flume to produce SSA."

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17.11.2015

# New Publications

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Quaas, Johannes (2015): Approaches to Observe Anthropogenic Aerosol-Cloud Interactions

Quaas, Johannes (2015): Approaches to Observe Anthropogenic Aerosol-Cloud Interactions. In Curr Clim Change Rep 1 (4), pp. 297–304. DOI: 10.1007/s40641-015-0028-0 

"Anthropogenic aerosol particles exert an—quantitatively very uncertain—effective radiative forcing due to aerosol-cloud interactions via an immediate altering of cloud albedo on the one hand and via rapid adjustments by alteration of cloud processes and by changes in thermodynamic profiles on the other hand. Large variability in cloud cover and properties and the therefore low signal-to-noise ratio for aerosol-induced perturbations hamper the identification of effects in observations."

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01.10.2015

# Media

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Irish Times: Could cloud brightening be Earth’s last chance?

"A project aims to manipulate cloud formations in order to combat climate change. The naysayers are lining up, but the group argues there are few viable options left"

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27.08.2015

# Projects

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Project: Marine Cloud Brightening Project (international)

"The Marine Cloud Brightening Project is an open, international collaboration of atmospheric scientists and other experts to advance understanding of cloud responses to aerosol particles - a critical part of understanding the climate, and a critical area in which human activities are thought to cause significant effects."

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