19.08.2017

# Media

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the guardian: Silver linings: the climate scientist who records cloud behaviour

"Clouds cool the planet by reflecting solar energy back to space and also trap heat and radiate it back to Earth. In a Yale Environment 360 interview, physicist Kate Marvel discusses the double-edged effect clouds have on rising temperatures."

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17.08.2017

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Yale Environment 360: Investigating the Enigma of Clouds and Climate Change

"With geoengineering, I’m always very concerned because if I want to do an experiment on human subjects, as a university researcher, I have to go in front of a review board and convince them that all of my human subjects have given informed consent to participate in this experiment. And with a lot of geo-engineering experiments, I worry about how that consent is going to be obtained."

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07.08.2017

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Xinhua: To cool planet, researchers propose spraying particles into marine clouds

"A group of researchers at the University of Washington (UW) is investigating the idea of marine cloud brightening as a strategy to offset global warming. As a short-term measure for a possible future emergency situation, the strategy involves spraying saltwater into clouds above oceans to boost their capacity to reflect sunlight. In a paper published in the journal Earth's Future, two UW researchers, including lead author Rob Wood, a professor of atmospheric sciences, say small-scale tests of marine cloud brightening would also help answer scientific questions about clouds and aerosols' possible role to help cool the planet."

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03.08.2017

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Anthropocene: Scientists Make the Case for Spraying Saltwater Into Clouds to Help Cool the Planet

"In a new study, researchers at the University of Washington make the case for a geoengineering method known as marine cloud brightening. The technique calls for spraying saltwater into low-lying marine clouds, where they help create more clouds that reflect heat back into space. The UW scientists say in the journal Earth’s Future that conducting small, controlled marine cloud brightening experiments would provide unprecedented data to understand the effects of aerosols on cloud formation and the resulting reflection of sunlight."

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27.07.2017

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GlobalSpec: A Geoengineering Technique Called Cloud Brightening Could Slow Global Warming

"A new University of Washington study focuses on the idea of marine cloud brightening, which is being studied by a UW group as a strategy to offset global warming. The strategy is to spray saltwater into the air to make marine clouds reflect more incoming solar rays. Small-scale tests of marine cloud brightening could help answer many scientific questions about clouds and aerosols. The goal for these geoengineering tests would follow the recommendations from U.S. National Academies of Sciences’ 2015 that said any tests of geoengineering also yields scientific benefits."

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18.06.2017

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The National UEA: Sunny outlook for rain-inducing cloud seeding, researchers forecast

"In Britain, projects have analysed whether cloud seeding could help to lower the temperatures of the sea surface, which could make hurricanes less powerful by starving them of energy. Perhaps more outlandish is the suggestion that cloud seeding could limit global warming. Among those interested in producing clouds that could reflect sunlight is Stephen Salter, emeritus professor of engineering design at the University of Edinburgh."

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14.06.2017

# New Publications

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Lauvset, Siv K.; et al. (2017): Climate engineering and the ocean. Effects on biogeochemistry and primary production

Lauvset, Siv K.; Tjiputra, Jerry; Muri, Helene (2017): Climate engineering and the ocean. Effects on biogeochemistry and primary production. In: Biogeosciences Discuss., S. 1–36. DOI: 10.5194/bg-2017-235

"Here we use an Earth System Model with interactive biogeochemistry to project future ocean biogeochemistry impacts from large-scale deployment of three different radiation management (RM) climate engineering (also known as geoengineering) methods: stratospheric aerosol injection (SAI), marine sky brightening (MSB), and cirrus cloud thinning (CCT). We apply RM such that the change in radiative forcing in the RCP8.5 emission scenario is reduced to the change in radiative forcing in the RCP4.5 scenario. The resulting global mean sea surface temperatures in the RM experiments are comparable to those in RCP4.5, but there are regional differences."

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02.06.2017

# New Publications

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Ahlm, Lars; et al. (2017): Marine cloud brightening – as effective without clouds

"Here we present results from coordinated simulations with three Earth system models (ESMs) participating in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) G4sea-salt experiment. Injection rates of accumulation mode sea spray aerosol particles over ocean between 30° N and 30° S are set in each model to generate a global-mean effective radiative forcing (ERF) of −2.0 W m−2 at the top of atmosphere. We find that the injection increases the cloud droplet number concentration in lower layers, reduces the cloud-top effective droplet radius, and increases the cloud optical depth over the injection area."

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21.04.2017

# Media

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MIT Technology Review: Scientists Consider Brighter Clouds to Preserve the Great Barrier Reef

"As bleaching devastates the critical ecosystem for a second year in a row, marine scientists are getting desperate."

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19.11.2016

# New Publications

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Quaas, Johannes; et al. (2016): Regional climate engineering by radiation management: Prerequisites and prospects

Quaas, Johannes; Quaas, Martin F.; Boucher, Olivier; Rickels, Wilfried (2016): Regional climate engineering by radiation management: Prerequisites and prospects. In Earth’s Future. DOI 10.1002/2016EF000440.

"In this paper, we discuss the idea that RM can be differentiated and scaled in several dimensions with potential objectives being to influence a certain climate parameter in a specific region. Some short-lived climate forcers (e.g., tropospheric aerosols) exhibit strong geographical and temporal variability, potentially leading to limited- area climate responses. Marine cloud brightening and thinning or dissolution of cirrus clouds could be operated at a rather local scale."

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