22.09.2017

# New Publications

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Burns, Wil; Nicholson, Simon (2017): Bioenergy and carbon capture with storage (BECCS). The prospects and challenges of an emerging climate policy response

Burns, Wil; Nicholson, Simon (2017): Bioenergy and carbon capture with storage (BECCS). The prospects and challenges of an emerging climate policy response. In J Environ Stud Sci 15 (2), p. 1360. DOI: 10.1007/s13412-017-0445-6.

"There is increasing impetus for large-scale deployment of carbon dioxide removal geoengineering approaches to help keep temperatures to below 2 °C, as provided for under the Paris Agreement. The primary option that has been discussed to date is Bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS). While BECCS could sequester very large amounts of carbon dioxide, it also poses substantial socio-economic risks to society, as well as threats to biodiversity. This essay suggests that a human rights-based approach can help to protect the interests of those who might be adversely impacted by BECCS deployment."

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13.12.2016

# Media

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Energy Mix: UN Affirms ‘Precautionary Approach’ to Planetary Geoengineering

"Stressing a “precautionary approach” to meddling with the earth’s systems on a planetary scale, the biennial meeting of the UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) is poised to recommend against large-scale geoengineering experiments until the impacts on oceans and the atmosphere are better understood."

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10.12.2016

# Media

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SDG Knowledge Hub: UN Biodiversity Conference Advances Work on Sustainable Wildlife Management, Climate-related Geo-Engineering

"Working Group II approved without, or with minor discussion, conference room papers (CRPs) on sustainable wildlife management, recommendations from the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII), and climate-related geo-engineering."

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12.11.2016

# Media

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IISD: CBD Report Highlights Uncertainties of Geoengineering Assessment

"The Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) has reported on the potential impacts of geoengineering techniques on biodiversity and regulatory developments. The technical report provides an update on these issues following 2012 technical studies on the impacts of climate-related geoengineering on biodiversity and the regulatory framework for climate-related geoengineering relevant to the Convention."

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09.10.2016

# Media

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New Scientist: Let’s harness synthetic biology to fix our broken planet

"If we want to reverse desertification, synthetic bacteria are one of the safer geoengineering options, says biologist."

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25.03.2016

# New Publications

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McCormack, Caitlin G.; et al. (2016): Key impacts of climate engineering on biodiversity and ecosystems, with priorities for future research

McCormack, Caitlin G.; Born, Wanda; Irvine, Peter J.; Achterberg, Eric P.; Amano, Tatsuya; Ardron, Jeff et al. (2016): Key impacts of climate engineering on biodiversity and ecosystems, with priorities for future research. In Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences, pp. 1–26. DOI 10.1080/1943815X.2016.1159578.

"A literature review was carried out to identify details of the potential ecological effects of climate engineering techniques. A group of biodiversity and environmental change researchers then employed a modified Delphi expert consultation technique to evaluate this evidence and prioritize the effects based on the relative importance of, and scientific understanding about, their biodiversity and ecosystem consequences."

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04.01.2016

# New Publications

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Heck, Vera; et al. (2015): Is extensive terrestrial carbon dioxide removal a ‘green’ form of geoengineering? A global modelling study

Heck, Vera; Gerten, Dieter; Lucht, Wolfgang; Boysen, Lena R. (2015): Is extensive terrestrial carbon dioxide removal a ‘green’ form of geoengineering? A global modelling study. In Global and Planetary Change. DOI 10.1016/j.gloplacha.2015.12.008.

"As it is a plant-based CE option that extracts CO2 from the atmosphere, it might be considered a ‘green’ CE method that moves the biosphere closer to its natural, i.e. pre-Neolithic, state. Here, we test this hypothesis by comparing the biogeochemical (water- and carbon-related) changes induced by biomass plantations compared to those induced by historical human land cover and land use change. Results indicate that large-scale biomass plantations would produce a biogeochemical shift in the terrestrial biosphere which is, in absolute terms, even larger than that already produced by historical land use change."

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12.10.2015

# Political Papers

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Secretariat of the CBD (2015): Update on Climate Geoengineering in relation to the Convention on Biological Diversity. Potential Impacts and Regulatory Framework

Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity (2015): Update on Climate Geoengineering in relation to the Convention on Biological Diversity. Potential Impacts and Regulatory Framework (provisional agenda, item 4.2).

"The present note expands on the interim update prepared for SBSTTA-18, with the inclusion of additional information from the Synthesis Report of the Fifth Assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and other more recent publications. This report has been prepared by the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity with the assistance of the lead authors of Parts I and II of CBD Technical Series No. 66."

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18.08.2015

# Calls & events

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Call for Review:

Deadline for Review: 31. August 2015

Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity (2015): Update on Climate Geoengineering in relation to the Convention on Biological Diversity. Potential Impacts and Regulatory Framework. Unedited Advanced Draft for Review not for Citation.

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02.05.2013

# Media

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chinadialogue: Is it better to let the Greenland ice sheet collapse or use geoengineering?

Expert discussion. "Two leading climate academics – Ken Caldeira and Clive Hamilton – debate the issue of geoengineering and whether it should be allowed to go-ahead"

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