25.01.2018

# New Publications

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Sonntag, Sebastian; et al. (2018): Quantifying and comparing effects of climate engineering methods on the Earth system

Sonntag, Sebastian; González, Miriam Ferrer; Ilyina, Tatiana; Kracher, Daniela; Nabel, Julia E. M. S.; Niemeier, Ulrike et al. (2018): Quantifying and comparing effects of climate engineering methods on the Earth system. In Earth's Future. DOI: 10.1002/2017EF000620.

"To contribute to a quantitative comparison of climate engineering (CE) methods, we assess atmosphere-, ocean-, and land-based CE measures with respect to Earth system effects consistently within one comprehensive model. We use the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model (MPI-ESM) with prognostic carbon cycle to compare solar radiation management (SRM) by stratospheric sulfur injection and two carbon dioxide removal methods: afforestation and ocean alkalinization. The CE model experiments are designed to offset the effect of fossil-fuel burning on global mean surface air temperature under the RCP8.5 scenario to follow or get closer to the RCP4.5 scenario."

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17.12.2017

# New Publications

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Feng, E. Y.; et al. (2017): Model-based Assessment of the CO2 Sequestration Potential of Coastal Ocean Alkalinization

Feng, E. Y.; Koeve, W.; Keller, D. P.; Oschlies, A. (2017): Model-based Assessment of the CO2 Sequestration Potential of Coastal Ocean Alkalinization. In Earth's Future. DOI: 10.1002/2017EF000659.

"The potential of Coastal Ocean Alkalinization (COA), a carbon dioxide removal (CDR) climate engineering strategy that chemically increases ocean carbon uptake and storage, is investigated with an Earth system model of intermediate complexity. The CDR potential and possible environmental side effects are estimated for various COA deployment scenarios, assuming olivine as the alkalinity source in ice-free coastal waters (about 8.6% of the global ocean's surface area), with dissolution rates being a function of grain size, ambient seawater temperature and pH. Our results indicate that for a large-enough olivine deployment of small-enough grain sizes (10 μm), atmospheric CO2 could be reduced by more than 800 GtC by the year 2100."

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20.11.2017

# New Publications

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Ferrer-Gonzalez, Miriam (2017): Climate engineering by enhancement of ocean alkalinity: impacts on the Earth system and a comparison with solar radiation management

Ferrer-Gonzalez, Miriam (2017): Climate engineering by enhancement of ocean alkalinity: impacts on the Earth system and a comparison with solar radiation management. PhD Thesis. Edited by Universität Hamburg. Max-Planck-Institut für Meteorologie. Hamburg (Reports on Earth System Science, 193).

"For the rst time, the CE-driven e ects on the Earth system of large-scale AOA and SRM scenarios are consistently compared in a comprehensive Earth system model with interactive carbon cycle. Using the Max Planck Institute Earth
System Model (MPI-ESM) forced by fossil-fuel CO2 emissions, I explore the impacts of these CE methods on the global carbon uptake and ocean biogeochemistry. I design and run AOA scenarios that reduce atmospheric CO2 levels to the trajectory of the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 4.5 in a high CO2 world following the RCP8.5 scenario."

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19.07.2016

# New Publications

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Feng, Ellias Y.; et al. (2016): Could artificial ocean alkalinization protect tropical coral ecosystems from ocean acidification?

Feng, Ellias Y.; Keller, David P.; Koeve, Wolfgang; Oschlies, Andreas (2016): Could artificial ocean alkalinization protect tropical coral ecosystems from ocean acidification? In Environ. Res. Lett. 11 (7), p. 74008–74008. DOI 10.1088/1748-9326/11/7/074008.

"Artificial ocean alkalinization (AOA) is investigated as a method to mitigate local ocean acidification and protect tropical coral ecosystems during a 21st century high CO2 emission scenario. Employing an Earth system model of intermediate complexity, our implementation of AOA in the Great Barrier Reef, Caribbean Sea and South China Sea regions, shows that alkalinization has the potential to counteract expected 21st century local acidification in regard to both oceanic surface aragonite saturation Ω and surface pCO2."

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30.05.2016

# New Publications

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González, Miriam Ferrer; Ilyina, Tatiana (2016): Impacts of artificial ocean alkalinization on the carbon cycle and climate in Earth system simulations

González, Miriam Ferrer; Ilyina, Tatiana (2016): Impacts of artificial ocean alkalinization on the carbon cycle and climate in Earth system simulations. In Geophys. Res. Lett. DOI 10.1002/2016GL068576.

"Using the state-of-the-art emissions-driven Max-Planck-Institute Earth system model, we explore the impacts of artificial ocean alkalinization (AOA) with a scenario based on the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) framework. Addition of 114 Pmol of alkalinity to the surface ocean stabilizes atmospheric CO2 concentration to RCP4.5 levels under RCP8.5 emissions."

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24.04.2015

# New Publications

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Ilyina, Tatiana (2015): The Combined Effects of Changes in Ocean Chemistry, Biology, and Hydrodynamics on Alkalinity

Ilyina, Tatiana (2015): The Combined Effects of Changes in Ocean Chemistry, Biology, and Hydrodynamics on Alkalinity. In Nova Acta Leopoldina 121 (408), pp. 107–110.

"Therefore, understanding the spatiotemporal distribution of TA changes is critical to grasp the oceanic capacity to uptake and store carbon. Furthermore, dissolution of CO2 in seawater does not change TA, but may affect processes controlling its cycling. Hence, it is also interesting to study TA in the context of climate change, i. e. in a rising CO2 ocean."

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24.04.2015

# New Publications

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Ferrer-Gonzalez, Miriam; Ilyina, Tatiana (2015): Mitigation Potential, Risks, and Side-Effects of Ocean Alkalinity Enhancement

Ferrer-Gonzalez, Miriam; Ilyina, Tatiana (2015): Mitigation Potential, Risks, and Side-Effects of Ocean Alkalinity Enhancement. In Nova Acta Leopoldina 121 (408), pp. 275–278.

"The novelty of our research relies on the fact that none of previous studies have addressed this topic with a fully coupled Earth system model of such a level of complexity. Fully coupled set-ups (versus box-models or forced subsystems) hold the potential of revealing new features within the Earth system dynamics."

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