04.05.2017

# New Publications

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Boysen, Lena R.; et al. (2017): Trade-offs for food production, nature conservation and climate limit the terrestrial carbon dioxide removal potential

Boysen, Lena R.; Lucht, Wolfgang; Gerten, Dieter (2017): Trade-offs for food production, nature conservation and climate limit the terrestrial carbon dioxide removal potential. In Glob Chang Biol. DOI: 10.1111/gcb.13745.

"We integrate these factors in one spatially explicit biogeochemical simulation framework to explore the tCDR opportunity space on land available after these constraints are taken into account, starting either in 2020 or 2050, and lasting until 2100. We find that assumed future needs for nature protection and food production strongly limit tCDR potentials. BPs on abandoned crop and pasture areas (~1300 Mha in scenarios of either 8.0 billion people and yield gap reductions of 25% until 2020 or 9.5 billion people and yield gap reductions of 50% until 2050) could, theoretically, sequester ~100 GtC in land carbon stocks and biomass harvest by 2100."

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29.04.2017

# Political Papers

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GDAE (2017): Hope Below Our Feet. Soil as a Climate Solution

GDAE (2017): Hope Below Our Feet. Soil as a Climate Solution. With assistance of Anne-Marie Codur, Seth Itzkan, William Moomaw, Karl Thidemann, Jonathan Harris. Global Development and Environment Institute (Climate Policy Briefing, 4).

"Soils hold about three times more carbon than the atmosphere, and an increase in soil carbon content worldwide could close the “emissions gap” between carbon dioxide reductions pledged at the Paris Agreement of 2015 and those deemed necessary to limit warming to 2oC or less by 2100. To meet this challenge, several international efforts to build soil carbon have been launched, with similar measures underway in the United States."

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15.04.2017

# New Publications

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Bright, Ryan M.; et al. (2017): Local temperature response to land cover and management change driven by non-radiative processes

Bright, Ryan M.; Davin, Edouard; O’Halloran, Thomas; Pongratz, Julia; Zhao, Kaiguang; Cescatti, Alessandro (2017): Local temperature response to land cover and management change driven by non-radiative processes. In Nature Climate change 7 (4), pp. 296–302. DOI: 10.1038/nclimate3250.

"Here, we combine extensive records of remote sensing and in situ observation to show that non-radiative mechanisms dominate the local response in most regions for eight of nine common LCMC perturbations. We find that forest cover gains lead to an annual cooling in all regions south of the upper conterminous United States, northern Europe, and Siberia—reinforcing the attractiveness of re-/afforestation as a local mitigation and adaptation measure in these regions."

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11.01.2017

# Media

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Science: Is wood a green source of energy? Scientists are divided

"The bottom line for climate can shift depending on how far into the future researchers peer. The EPA panel on which Abt and Khanna sit has endorsed a long view. In its latest draft, the group recommends doing carbon accounting over a 100-year timeframe, based on research suggesting that it takes that long for the planet to feel the full impact of cumulative greenhouse gas emissions. Such long tallies give new forests plenty of time to mature and recapture carbon, making wood appear closer to carbon neutral."

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04.01.2017

# New Publications

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Ryngaert, Cedric (2016): Climate Change Mitigation Techniques and International Law. Assessing the Externalities of Reforestation and Geoengineering

Ryngaert, Cedric (2016): Climate Change Mitigation Techniques and International Law. Assessing the Externalities of Reforestation and Geoengineering. In: Ratio Juris. DOI: 10.1111/raju.12154.

"The article reviews such global public goods-protecting techniques as compensation payments for keeping rainforests intact, and climate engineering, for their adverse impact on human rights and biodiversity. Espousing a consequentialist ethical perspective, it calls for increased vigilance in institutionally designing and implementing climate change mitigation mechanisms, however well-intentioned these may be."

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08.11.2016

# Media

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Center for Carbon Removal: Carbon Removal Spotlight: Afforest4Future

"Here, at the Center for Carbon Removal, we aim to highlight the entrepreneurs and projects in the carbon removal space. We sat down with Vesela Tanaskovic, Chief Scientific Officer of Afforest4Future, to discuss how her group is working to rebuild soils in desert regions. Read our conversation below! "

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12.09.2016

# Media

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Science Daily: Seeing the forest for the trees: World's largest reforestation program overlooks wildlife

"New research found that China's reforestation program, the world's largest, overwhelmingly leads to the planting of monoculture forests that fall short of restoring the biodiversity of native forests -- and can even harm existing wildlife. The researchers found, however, that multi-species forests could be planted without detracting from the economic benefits China's poor and rural citizens receive for replanting forests."

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12.09.2016

# Media

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the guardian: Our best shot at cooling the planet might be right under our feet

"Studies suggest that regenerating soil by turning our backs on industrial farming holds the key to tackling climate change"

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12.09.2016

# Media

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Forest News: Q & A: Lessons from Ethiopia for forest landscape restoration

"An interview with CIFOR Scientist Habtemariam Kassa. [...] Every year trees are planted, but nobody comes and looks at their survival rate – and in fact our quick assessment indicated that trees planted by smallholder framers themselves on their own land had a much higher survival rates while tree planted through state-led tree planting campaigns showed very low survival rates."

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09.09.2016

# Media

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Forests News: Q&A: Lessons from China for forest landscape restoration

"The basic principle is that increasing biomass in landscapes – and that can be trees, shrubs or even grasses, like bamboo – generates multiple environmental benefits such as carbon capture, water purification and flood control."

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