07.02.2018

# New Publications

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Cao, Long (2018): The Effects of Solar Radiation Management on the Carbon Cycle

Cao, Long (2018): The Effects of Solar Radiation Management on the Carbon Cycle. In Curr Clim Change Rep 8 (2), p. 605. DOI: 10.1007/s40641-018-0088-z.

"The effect of solar geoengineering on terrestrial primary productivity is typically much smaller than that of CO2 fertilization. Changes in the partitioning between direct and diffuse radiation in response to stratospheric aerosol injection could substantially alter modeled plant productivity. Inclusion of the nitrogen cycle would further modify the terrestrial response to solar geoengineering."

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05.02.2018

# Media

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Vice News: Scientists hope this volcano can save us from a fiery death

"“If the solar radiation management is halted for any reason, then a rapid warming would result, with likely catastrophic consequences,” Dennis Hartmann, a professor of atmospheric sciences at the University of Washington told tech and science website Futurism."

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05.02.2018

# Media

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Tech Times: Can Volcanoes Help Cool The Earth? Scientists Are Preparing For The Next Big Eruption

"What is geoengineering? Simply put, geoengineering is an attempt to reduce or mitigate the effects of climate change by directly altering certain parts of the Earth's natural systems. An example of this is the process of injecting the atmosphere with sulfate particles to mimic the cooling effects of a volcanic eruption."

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05.02.2018

# Media

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New York Times: The Next Big Volcano Could Briefly Cool Earth. NASA Wants to Be Ready

"One geoengineering approach would use high-flying jets to spray similar chemicals in the stratosphere. So by studying the next big volcanic eruption, scientists would also gain insights into how such a scheme, known as solar radiation management, or S.R.M., might work. “This is important if we’re ever going to do geoengineering,” said Alan Robock, a Rutgers University researcher who models the effects of eruptions and who has been involved in discussions about the rapid-response project. “But even if there were no such thing as geoengineering, it’s still important to understand how volcanoes affect climate.”"

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04.02.2018

# Media

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TeCake: The Volcano that can aid to reduce global warming, says NASA

"Alan Robock, a climatologist at Rutgers University, who studies volcanic eruptions and has been involved in discussions about the rapid-response project, says in a statement, “This is important if we’re ever going to do geoengineering.” He continues further, “but even if there were no such thing as geoengineering, it’s still important to understand how volcanoes affect climate.”"

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01.02.2018

# Media

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earth.com: The safest climate engineering strategies to reduce extreme temps

"Researchers have found that large-scale, international efforts to regulate the climate by modifying properties of the land surface in highly populated and agricultural areas could be very successful. The study from the University of New South Wales suggests that this type of climate engineering could reduce extreme temperatures by up to 3 degrees Celsius in North America, Europe, and Asia."

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30.01.2018

# Media

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Science Daily: How to reduce heat extremes by 2-3 degrees Celsius

"How changing crops, moving to no till agriculture and lightening infrastructure can reduce extreme temperatures."

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30.01.2018

# New Publications

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Seneviratne, Sonia I.; et al. (2018): Land radiative management as contributor to regional-scale climate adaptation and mitigation

Seneviratne, Sonia I.; Phipps, Steven J.; Pitman, Andrew J.; Hirsch, Annette L.; Davin, Edouard L.; Donat, Markus G. et al. (2018): Land radiative management as contributor to regional-scale climate adaptation and mitigation. In Nature Geosci 529, p. 477. DOI: 10.1038/s41561-017-0057-5.

"A reduction of global mean temperature through global-scale management of solar radiation could lead to strong regional disparities and affect rainfall patterns. On the other hand, active management of land radiative effects on a regional scale represents an alternative option of climate engineering that has been little discussed. Regional land radiative management could help to counteract warming, in particular hot extremes in densely populated and important agricultural regions. Regional land radiative management also raises some ethical issues, and its efficacy would be limited in time and space, depending on crop growing periods and constraints on agricultural management."

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30.01.2018

# Media

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Inquirer: Mayon, geoengineering and climate change

"Given the high risks associated with geoengineering, decarbonizing energy systems—the principal contributors to human-induced climate change—through a rapid transition to a 100-percent-renewable-energy future, alongside changes in our consumption behaviors, remains our best shot for mitigating the impacts of climate change."

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26.01.2018

# New Publications

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Irvine, Peter J.; et al. (2018): Brief communication. Understanding solar geoengineering's potential to limit sea level rise requires attention from cryosphere experts

Irvine, Peter J.; Keith, David W.; Moore, John (2018): Brief communication. Understanding solar geoengineering's potential to limit sea level rise requires attention from cryosphere experts. In The Cryosphere Discuss., pp. 1–15. DOI: 10.5194/tc-2017-279.

"Stratospheric aerosol geoengineering, a form of solar geoengineering, is a proposal to add a reflective layer of aerosol to the stratosphere to reduce net radiative forcing and so to reduce the risks of climate change. Solar geoengineering could reduce temperatures and so slow melt, but the efficacy of solar geoengineering at offsetting changes to the cryosphere is uncertain. For example, shortwave forcing acts more strongly on the surface than longwave forcing so solar geoengineering would reduce surface melt more effectively but would also suppress the global hydrological cycle potentially reducing accumulation on glaciers."

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