11.08.2017

# Media

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Carbon News: To stop climate change, should we aim to dim the sky?

"SOLAR geoengineering is a controversial process to reduce heat. Some researchers say it might be humanity's last line of defense to stop greenhouse gas emissions."

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07.08.2017

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Xinhua: To cool planet, researchers propose spraying particles into marine clouds

"A group of researchers at the University of Washington (UW) is investigating the idea of marine cloud brightening as a strategy to offset global warming. As a short-term measure for a possible future emergency situation, the strategy involves spraying saltwater into clouds above oceans to boost their capacity to reflect sunlight. In a paper published in the journal Earth's Future, two UW researchers, including lead author Rob Wood, a professor of atmospheric sciences, say small-scale tests of marine cloud brightening would also help answer scientific questions about clouds and aerosols' possible role to help cool the planet."

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04.08.2017

# New Publications

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Kleinschmitt, Christoph; et al. (2017): Sensitivity of the radiative forcing by stratospheric sulfur geoengineering to the amount and strategy of the SO2 injection studied with the LMDZ-S3A model

Kleinschmitt, Christoph; Boucher, Olivier; Platt, Ulrich (2017): Sensitivity of the radiative forcing by stratospheric sulfur geoengineering to the amount and strategy of the SO2 injection studied with the LMDZ-S3A model. In Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., pp. 1–34. DOI: 10.5194/acp-2017-722.

"In this study we use the atmospheric general circulation model LMDZ with the sectional aerosol module S3A to determine how the forcing efficiency depends on the injected amount, the injection height and the spatio-temporal pattern of injection. We find that the forcing efficiency may decrease more drastically for larger SO2 injections than previously estimated. As a result, the net instantaneous radiative forcing does not exceed −2 W m−2 for continuous equatorial injections and it decreases (in absolute value) for the largest injection rates simulated (50 Tg S yr−1)."

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31.07.2017

# New Publications

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Nalam, Aditya; et al. (2017): Effects of Arctic geoengineering on precipitation in the tropical monsoon regions

Nalam, Aditya; Bala, Govindasamy; Modak, Angshuman (2017): Effects of Arctic geoengineering on precipitation in the tropical monsoon regions. In Clim Dyn 41 (1), p. 1738. DOI: 10.1007/s00382-017-3810-y.

"In this study, we investigate and quantify the implications of this ITCZ shift due to Arctic geoengineering for the global monsoon regions using the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 coupled to a slab ocean model. A doubling of CO2 from pre-industrial levels leads to a warming of ~6 K in the Arctic region and precipitation in the monsoon regions increases by up to ~15%. In our Arctic geoengineering simulation which illustrates a plausible latitudinal distribution of the reduction in sunlight, an addition of sulfate aerosols (11 Mt) in the Arctic stratosphere nearly offsets the Arctic warming due to CO2 doubling but this shifts the ITCZ southward by ~1.5° relative to the pre-industrial climate."

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27.07.2017

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GlobalSpec: A Geoengineering Technique Called Cloud Brightening Could Slow Global Warming

"A new University of Washington study focuses on the idea of marine cloud brightening, which is being studied by a UW group as a strategy to offset global warming. The strategy is to spray saltwater into the air to make marine clouds reflect more incoming solar rays. Small-scale tests of marine cloud brightening could help answer many scientific questions about clouds and aerosols. The goal for these geoengineering tests would follow the recommendations from U.S. National Academies of Sciences’ 2015 that said any tests of geoengineering also yields scientific benefits."

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27.07.2017

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MIT Technology Review: This Scientist Is Taking the Next Step in Geoengineering

"Harvard’s David Keith explains why it’s time to move forward with outdoor experiments and broader research programs."

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25.07.2017

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Carnegie Science: Could “cocktail geoengineering” save the climate?

On Cao, Long; et al. (2017). "Geoengineering is a catch-all term that refers to various theoretical ideas for altering Earth’s energy balance to combat climate change. New research from an international team of atmospheric scientists published by Geophysical Research Letters investigates for the first time the possibility of using a “cocktail” of geoengineering tools to reduce changes in both temperature and precipitation caused by atmospheric greenhouse gases."

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25.07.2017

# New Publications

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Cao, Long; et al. (2017): Simultaneous stabilization of global temperature and precipitation through cocktail geoengineering

Cao, Long; Duan, Lei; Bala, Govindasamy; Caldeira, Ken (2017): Simultaneous stabilization of global temperature and precipitation through cocktail geoengineering. In Geophys. Res. Lett. 37 (D6), p. 117. DOI: 10.1002/2017GL074281.

"Here we investigate the possibility of stabilizing both global mean temperature and precipitation simultaneously by combining two geoengineering approaches: stratospheric sulfate aerosol increase (SAI) that deflects sunlight to space and cirrus cloud thinning (CCT) that enables more longwave radiation to escape to space."

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24.07.2017

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Newsweek: Climate Change and Geoengineering: Artificially Cooling Planet Earth by Thinning Cirrus Clouds

"Over recent decades, scientists from across the globe have been discussing the potential of geoengineering—the deliberate manipulation of the environment that could, in theory, cool the planet and help stabilize the climate."

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24.07.2017

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Live Science: Cool the Planet? Geoengineering Is Easier Said Than Done

""If cirrus clouds behave like a blanket around the Earth, you're trying to get rid of that blanket," Lohmann, a professor of experimental atmospheric physics at ETH Zurich, told Live Science."

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