16.04.2015

# New Publications

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Niemeier, U.; Timmreck, C. (2015): What is the limit of stratospheric sulfur climate engineering?

Niemeier, U.; Timmreck, C. (2015): What is the limit of stratospheric sulfur climate engineering? In Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss. 15 (7), pp. 10939–10969. DOI 10.5194/acpd-15-10939-2015.

"The injection of sulfur dioxide (SO2) into the stratosphere to form an artificial stratospheric aerosol layer is considered as an option for solar radiation management. The related reduction in radiative forcing depends upon the amount injected of sulfur dioxide but aerosol model studies indicate a decrease in forcing efficiency with increasing injection magnitude."

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13.04.2015

# New Publications

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Korhonen, Hannele; Partanen, Antti-Ilari (2014): Cloud Brightening and Climate Change

Korhonen, Hannele; Partanen, Antti-Ilari (2014): Cloud Brightening and Climate Change. In Bill Freedman (Ed.): Global Environmental Change. Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, pp. 777–782.

"While climate models suggest that cloud brightening might be able to offset at least some of the predicted global warming, large uncertainties remain related to the efficiency as well as to the environmental and regional climate impacts of the method."

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10.04.2015

# Media

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BBC Radio: High Explosive: The Tambora Story

Linked to SRM. "On its 200th anniversary, the story of far and away the worst volcanic eruption in the record of human history. The Mount Tambora event, in Indonesia, killed tens of thousands in the immediate vicinity."

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08.04.2015

# New Publications

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Nagase, H.; et al. (2015): Effects of Injected Ice Particles in the Lower Stratosphere on the Antarctic Ozone Hole

Nagase, H.; Kinnison, D. E.; Petersen, K.; Vitt, F.; Brasseur, G. P. (2015): Effects of Injected Ice Particles in the Lower Stratosphere on the Antarctic Ozone Hole. In Earth's Future, pp. n/a. DOI 10.1002/2014EF000266.

"In this paper, we suggest a geo-engineering approach that will remove substantial amounts of hydrogen chloride (HCl) from the lower stratosphere in fall and hence limit the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole in late winter and early spring. HCl will be removed by ice from the atmosphere at temperatures higher than the threshold under which polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are formed if sufficiently large amounts of ice are supplied to produce water saturation."

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03.03.2015

# New Publications

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Wilhelm, Micah; et al. (2015): Climate engineering of vegetated land for hot extremes mitigation: an Earth System Model sensitivity study

Wilhelm, Micah; Davin, Edouard L.; Seneviratne, Sonia I. (2015): Climate engineering of vegetated land for hot extremes mitigation: an Earth System Model sensitivity study. In J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., pp. n/a. DOI 10.1002/2014JD022293.

"Here we present the results of a series of transient global climate engineering sensitivity experiments performed with the Community Earth System Model (CESM) over the time period 1950-2100 under historical and RCP8.5 scenarios. Four sets of experiments are performed in which the surface albedo over snow-free vegetated grid points is increased respectively by 0.05, 0.10, 0.15 and 0.20."

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27.02.2015

# New Publications

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Heyen, Daniel; et al. (2015): Regional Disparities in Solar Radiation Management Impacts. Limitations to Simple Assessments and the Role of Diverging Preferences

Heyen, Daniel; Wiertz, Thilo; Irvine, Peter J. (2015): Regional Disparities in Solar Radiation Management Impacts. Limitations to Simple Assessments and the Role of Diverging Preferences (IASS Working Paper).

"Our main focus is the prevalent assumption in SRM research that, for all regions, any deviation from a past climate state inflicts damages."

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08.12.2014

# Media

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ClimateProgress Blog: Geoengineering Gone Wild: Newsweek Touts Turning Humans Into Hobbits To Save Climate

Response to Newsweek article. "The media likes geoengineering stories because they are clickbait involving all sorts of eye-popping science fiction (non)solutions to climate change that don’t actually require anything of their readers (or humanity) except infinite credulousness. And so Newsweek informs us that adorable ants might solve the problem or maybe phytoplankton can if given Popeye-like superstrength with a diet of iron or, as we’ll see, maybe we humans can, if we allow ourselves to be turned into hobbit-like creatures."

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08.12.2014

# New Publications

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Baum, Seth D. (2014): The great downside dilemma for risky emerging technologies

Baum, Seth D. (2014): The great downside dilemma for risky emerging technologies. In Phys. Scr. 89 (12), p. 128004–128004. DOI 10.1088/0031-8949/89/12/128004.

"This article discusses the great downside dilemma posed by the decision of whether or not to use these technologies. The dilemma is: use the technology, and risk the downside of catastrophic failure, or do not use the technology, and suffer through life without it."

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18.11.2014

# Media

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Harvard News: Adjusting Earth’s thermostat, with caution

"Harvard scientists say aspects of solar geoengineering can—and should—be tested without need for full-scale deployment"

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17.11.2014

# New Publications

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Corner, Adam; Pidgeon, Nick (2014): Geoengineering, climate change scepticism and the ‘moral hazard’ argument: an experimental study of UK public perceptions

Corner, Adam; Pidgeon, Nick (2014): Geoengineering, climate change scepticism and the ‘moral hazard’ argument: an experimental study of UK public perceptions. In Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society 372 (2031). DOI 10.1098/rsta.2014.0063.

"In this paper, we describe an online experiment with a representative sample of the UK public, in which participants read one of two arguments (either endorsing or rejecting the idea that geoengineering poses a moral hazard). The argument endorsing the idea of geoengineering as a moral hazard was perceived as more convincing overall."

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