22.03.2017

# New Publications

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Visioni, Daniele; et al. (2017): Sulfate geoengineering. A review of the factors controlling the needed injection of sulfur dioxide

Visioni, Daniele; Pitari, Giovanni; Aquila, Valentina (2017): Sulfate geoengineering. A review of the factors controlling the needed injection of sulfur dioxide. In Atmos. Chem. Phys 17 (6), pp. 3879–3889. DOI: 10.5194/acp-17-3879-2017.

"A review of previous studies on these effects is presented here, with an outline of the important factors that control the amount of sulfur dioxide to be injected in an eventual realization of the experiment. However, we need to take into account that atmospheric models used for these studies have shown a wide range of climate sensitivity and differences in the response to stratospheric volcanic aerosols. In addition, large uncertainties exist in the estimate of some of these aerosol effects."

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06.03.2017

# New Publications

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Smith, C. J.; et al. (2017): Impacts of stratospheric sulfate geoengineering on global solar photovoltaic and concentrating solar power resource. (in press)

Smith, C. J.; Crook, J. A.; Crook, R. (2017): Impacts of stratospheric sulfate geoengineering on global solar photovoltaic and concentrating solar power resource. (in press). In Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology.

"We analyze results from the HadGEM2-CCS climate model with stratospheric emissions of 10 Tg yr-1 of SO2, designed to offset global temperature rise by around 1°C. A reduction in concentrating solar power (CSP) output of 5.9% on average over land is shown under SSI compared to a baseline future climate change scenario (RCP4.5) due to a decrease in direct radiation."

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05.03.2017

# New Publications

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Ito, Akihiko (2017): Solar radiation management and ecosystem functional responses

Ito, Akihiko (2017): Solar radiation management and ecosystem functional responses. In Climatic Change 10, p. 84018. DOI: 10.1007/s10584-017-1930-3.

"In this study, I evaluate the impacts of SRM deployment on terrestrial ecosystem functions using a process-based ecosystem model (the Vegetation Integrative Simulator for Trace gases, VISIT) driven by the climate projections by multiple climate models. In the SRM-oriented climate projections, massive injection of sulphate aerosols into the stratosphere lead to increased scattering of solar radiation and delayed anthropogenic climate warming. The VISIT simulations show that canopy light absorption and gross primary production are enhanced in subtropics in spite of the slight decrease of total incident solar radiation."

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27.02.2017

# New Publications

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Low, Sean (2017): Engineering imaginaries: Anticipatory foresight for solar radiation management governance

Low, Sean (2017): Engineering imaginaries: Anticipatory foresight for solar radiation management governance. In The Science of the Total Environment 580, pp. 90–104. DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.07.200.

"This paper reports on the project Solar Radiation Management: Foresight for Governance (SRM4G), which aimed to encourage an anticipatory mode of thinking about the future of an engineered climate. Leveraging the participation of 15 scholars and practitioners heavily engaged in early conversations on SRM governance, SRM4G applied scenario construction to generate a set of alternative futures leading to 2030, each exercising different influences on the need for – and challenges associated with – development of SRM technologies."

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15.02.2017

# Political Papers

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Global Priorities Project (2017): Existential Risk. Diplomacy and Governance

Global Priorities Project (2017): Existential Risk. Diplomacy and Governance.

"Geoengineering technologies like Solar Radiation Management have the potential to mitigate risks from climate change, while at the same time posing risks of their own. The current lack of international norms on acceptable research practices may well be holding back safe exploration of climate engineering options."

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11.02.2017

# New Publications

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Quaas, Martin F.; et al. (2017): Are there reasons against open-ended research into solar radiation management? A model of intergenerational decision-making under uncertainty

Quaas, Martin F.; Quaas, Johannes; Rickels, Wilfried; Boucher, Olivier (2017): Are there reasons against open-ended research into solar radiation management? A model of intergenerational decision-making under uncertainty. In Journal of Environmental Economics and Management. DOI: 10.1016/j.jeem.2017.02.002.

"We propose a stylized model of intergenerational decision making on SRM research, greenhouse-gas abatement and SRM deployment, under uncertainties about (a) the extent of future climate damage and (b) effectiveness and potential harmful side-effects of SRM. Open-ended research may reveal either that SRM effectively reduces climate damage, or that it would cause more harm than benefits. We find that SRM research increases the likelihood of deployment (“slippery slope”), and derive conditions that it decreases abatement effort in expectation (“moral hazard”)."

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09.02.2017

# New Publications

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Reynolds, Jesse (2016): Solar Climate Engineering, Law, and Regulation

Reynolds, Jesse (2016): Solar Climate Engineering, Law, and Regulation. In Roger Brownsword, Eloise Scotford, Karen Yeung (Eds.): The Oxford handbook of the law and regulation of technology. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

"This chapter offers an introduction to solar climate engineering, and explores its potential, risks, and legal and regulatory challenges. It also contextualizes these proposals with respect to other emerging technologies and the broader socio-political milieu. The chapter discusses the contours of existing and potential regulation, particularly at the international level. These aspects include regulatory rationales, diverse characteristics of proposed regulatory regimes, difficulties in defining the regulatory target, and the management of uncertainty through precaution."

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09.02.2017

# New Publications

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Asayama, Shinichiro; et al. (2017): Ambivalent climate of opinions. Tensions and dilemmas in understanding geoengineering experimentation

Asayama, Shinichiro; Sugiyama, Masahiro; Ishii, Atsushi (2017): Ambivalent climate of opinions. Tensions and dilemmas in understanding geoengineering experimentation. In Geoforum 80, pp. 82–92. DOI: 10.1016/j.geoforum.2017.01.012.

"This paper examines how the meanings of geoengineering experimentation, specifically SAI field trials, are reconfigured in the deliberation of the lay public. To this end, we conducted focus groups with Japanese citizens in June 2015 on the geoengineering concept and SAI field trials."

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07.02.2017

# New Publications

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Laakso, Anton; et al. (2017): Radiative and climate effects of stratospheric sulfur geoengineering using seasonally varying injection areas

Laakso, Anton; Korhonen, Hannele; Romakkaniemi, Sami; Kokkola, Harri (2017): Radiative and climate effects of stratospheric sulfur geoengineering using seasonally varying injection areas. In: Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., S. 1–25. DOI: 10.5194/acp-2017-107.

"In this study we employ alternative aerosol injection scenarios to investigate if the resulting radiative forcing can be optimized to be zonally more uniform without decreasing the global efficacy. We used a global aerosol-climate model together with an Earth system model to study the radiative and climate effects of stratospheric sulfur injection scenarios with different injection areas. According to our simulations, varying the SO2 injection area seasonally would result in a similar global mean cooling effect as injecting SO2 to the equator, but with a more uniform zonal distribution of shortwave radiative forcing."

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02.02.2017

# New Publications

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Kärcher, Bernd (2017): Cirrus Clouds and Their Response to Anthropogenic Activities

Kärcher, Bernd (2017): Cirrus Clouds and Their Response to Anthropogenic Activities. In: Curr Clim Change Rep. DOI: 10.1007/s40641-017-0060-3.

"This review assesses recent observational and modeling evidence of how anthropogenic activities might affect cirrus. Changes in physical properties and chemical composition of liquid aerosol particles will unlikely affect cirrus significantly, but anthropogenic influences may occur through changes in heterogeneous ice nuclei."

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