23.04.2018

# New Publications

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Kravitz, Ben; et al. (2018): The climate effects of increasing ocean albedo. An idealized representation of solar geoengineering

Kravitz, Ben; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Hailong; Robock, Alan; Gabriel, Corey; Boucher, Olivier et al. (2018): The climate effects of increasing ocean albedo. An idealized representation of solar geoengineering. In Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., pp. 1–29. DOI: 10.5194/acp-2018-340.

"Marine cloud brightening has been proposed as a means of geoengineering/climate intervention, or deliberately altering the climate system to offset anthropogenic climate change. As an idealized representation of marine cloud brightening, this paper discusses experiment G1ocean-albedo of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP), involving an abrupt quadrupling of the CO2 concentration and an instantaneous increase in ocean albedo to maintain approximate net top-of-atmosphere radiative flux balance. Eleven Earth System Models are relatively consistent in their temperature, radiative flux, and hydrological cycle responses to this experiment."

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18.04.2018

# New Publications

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Wei, Liren; et al. (2018): Global streamflow and flood response to stratospheric aerosol geoengineering

Wei, Liren; Ji, Duoying; Miao, Chiyuan; Moore, John C. (2018): Global streamflow and flood response to stratospheric aerosol geoengineering. In Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., pp. 1–38. DOI: 10.5194/acp-2018-338.

"Flood risk is projected to increase under projections of future warming climates due to an enhanced hydrological cycle. Solar geoengineering is known to reduce precipitation and slowdown the hydrological cycle, and may be therefore be expected to offset increased flood risk. We examine this hypothesis using streamflow and river discharge responses to the representative concentration pathway RCP4.5 and Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) G4 experiments."

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16.04.2018

# Media

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EOS: Tailoring Aerosol Injections to Achieve Desired Climate Effects

"Two-dimensional simulations of sulfate aerosol injections suggest that solar geoengineering projects can be customized to maximize solar reflection and help achieve potential climate objectives."

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16.04.2018

# New Publications

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Russotto, Rick D.; Ackerman, Thomas P. (2018): Changes in clouds and thermodynamics under solar geoengineering and implications for required solar reduction

Russotto, Rick D.; Ackerman, Thomas P. (2018): Changes in clouds and thermodynamics under solar geoengineering and implications for required solar reduction. In Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., pp. 1–32. DOI: 10.5194/acp-2018-345.

"The amount of solar constant reduction required to offset the global warming from an increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration is an interesting question with implications for assessing the feasibility of solar geoengineering scenarios and for improving our theoretical understanding of Earth's climate response to greenhouse gas and solar forcings. This study investigates this question by analyzing the results of 11 coupled atmosphere-ocean global climate models running Experiment G1 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project, in which CO2 concentrations are abruptly quadrupled and the solar constant is simultaneously reduced by an amount tuned to maintain top of atmosphere energy balance and preindustrial global mean temperature."

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13.04.2018

# Media

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Saving Our World: How a last-ditch ‘planet-hacking’ plan could keep Earth habitable for longer

"The world is unlikely to hit the targets necessary to avoid catastrophic levels of climate change. Some think that as a last resort, we may need to temporarily cool the planet by modifying the skies. It wouldn’t solve the problem, but it might buy us time. This technology, called solar geoengineering, is so controversial that some experts think it could lead to global war. But just in case, a team of researchers at Harvard is planning to conduct one of the first outdoor geoengineering experiments."

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10.04.2018

# Media

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Science Daily: Geoengineering risks losers as well as winners for climate and wildfire risks

"Artificially altering the climate system to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius could increase the risks of wildfires in some areas, new research suggests."

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10.04.2018

# Media

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Science Newsline: Geoengineering Risks Losers as Well as Winners for Climate And Wildfire Risks

"However, the new research suggests that this method of geoengineering could also introduce its own new impacts by shifting global rainfall patterns. The research by scientists at the University of Exeter and the Met Office Hadley Centre, carried out as part of the EU-funded project HELIX, looked at the implications of this for global patterns of wildfire using computer models of the global climate."

 

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10.04.2018

# Media

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Phys.org: Geoengineering risks losers as well as winners for climate and wildfire risks

"Artificially altering the climate system to limit global warming to 1.5C could increase the risks of wildfires in some areas, new research suggests. While the international community is already aiming to limit global warming to below 2C by reducing greenhouse gas emissions, the more ambitious aim of a 1.5C limit is known to be challenging to reach in this way.

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10.04.2018

# New Publications

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Burton, C.; et al. (2018): Will fire danger be reduced by using Solar Radiation Management to limit global warming to 1.5°C compared to 2.0°C?

Burton, C.; Betts, R. A.; Jones, C. D.; Williams, K. (2018): Will fire danger be reduced by using Solar Radiation Management to limit global warming to 1.5°C compared to 2.0°C? In Geophys. Res. Lett. DOI: 10.1002/2018GL077848.

"Here we assess one theoretical solution using Solar Radiation Management to limit global mean warming to 1.5°C above pre‐industrial temperatures, and use the McArthur fire danger index to evaluate the change in fire danger. The results show that globally fire danger is reduced in most areas when temperatures are limited to 1.5°C compared to 2.0°C. The number of days where fire danger is ‘high’ or above is reduced by up to 30 days per year on average, although there are regional variations. In certain regions, fire danger is increased, experiencing 31 more days above ‘high’ fire danger. "

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10.04.2018

# Media

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Reuters: Rules to govern sun-dimming technology "urgently" needed - expert

"Large-scale use of sun-dimming technology could have a range of little-understood side effects, including potentially shifting Asian monsoons"

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