27.04.2017

# New Publications

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Lenferna, Alex; et al. (2017): Relevant Climate Response Tests for Stratospheric Aerosol Injection. A Combined Ethical and Scientific Analysis

Lenferna, Alex; Russotto, Rick; Tan, Amanda; Gardiner, Stephen; Ackerman, Thomas (2017): Relevant Climate Response Tests for Stratospheric Aerosol Injection. A Combined Ethical and Scientific Analysis. In Earth's Future. DOI: 10.1002/2016EF000504.

"In this paper, we focus on stratospheric sulfate injection as a geoengineering scheme, and provide a combined scientific and ethical analysis of climate response tests, which are a subset of outdoor tests that would seek to impose detectable and attributable changes to climate variables on global or regional scales. We assess the current state of scientific understanding on the plausibility and scalability of climate response tests. Then we delineate a minimal baseline against which to consider whether certain climate response tests would be relevant for a deployment scenario. Our analysis shows that some climate response tests, such as those attempting to detect changes in regional climate impacts, may not be deployable in time periods relevant to realistic geoengineering scenarios. This might pose significant challenges for justifying SSI deployment overall."

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24.04.2017

# New Publications

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Visschers, Vivianne; Shi, Jing; et al. (2017): Beliefs and values explain international differences in perception of solar radiation management: insights from a cross-country survey

Visschers, Vivianne; Shi, Jing; et al. (2017): Beliefs and values explain international differences in perception of solar radiation management: insights from a cross-country survey. In Climatic Change, DOI: 10.1007/s10584-017-1970-8

"We conducted an online survey on the general public’s perception and acceptance of SRM in Canada, China, Germany, Switzerland, the UK, and the USA. Our findings confirmed the need for an international perspective, as we found several cross-country differences. Chinese respondents, for example, indicated greater acceptance for SRM than their North American and European counterparts."

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21.04.2017

# Media

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MIT Technology Review: Scientists Consider Brighter Clouds to Preserve the Great Barrier Reef

"As bleaching devastates the critical ecosystem for a second year in a row, marine scientists are getting desperate."

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15.04.2017

# New Publications

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Bright, Ryan M.; et al. (2017): Local temperature response to land cover and management change driven by non-radiative processes

Bright, Ryan M.; Davin, Edouard; O’Halloran, Thomas; Pongratz, Julia; Zhao, Kaiguang; Cescatti, Alessandro (2017): Local temperature response to land cover and management change driven by non-radiative processes. In Nature Climate change 7 (4), pp. 296–302. DOI: 10.1038/nclimate3250.

"Here, we combine extensive records of remote sensing and in situ observation to show that non-radiative mechanisms dominate the local response in most regions for eight of nine common LCMC perturbations. We find that forest cover gains lead to an annual cooling in all regions south of the upper conterminous United States, northern Europe, and Siberia—reinforcing the attractiveness of re-/afforestation as a local mitigation and adaptation measure in these regions."

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12.04.2017

# Media

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[press review]: US solar geoengineering field study

Press coverage on Harvard project on testing stratospheric particle injection. (updated)


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08.04.2017

# Media

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ETC Group: Why SRM experiments are a bad idea

"Solar Radiation Management (SRM) describes a set of geoengineering techniques that aim to counter human-made climate change by artificially increasing the reflection of heat from sunlight (solar radiation) back into space. Some advocates have started using the term “solar geoengineering” – but these techniques are not related to solar power production."

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29.03.2017

# Media

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the guardian: Fear of solar geoengineering is healthy – but don't distort our research

"Fear of solar geoengineering is entirely healthy. Its mere prospect might be hyped by fossil fuel interests to thwart emissions cuts. It could be used by one or a few nations in a way that’s harmful to many. There might be some yet undiscovered risk making the technology much less effective in reality than the largely positive story told by computer models."

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24.03.2017

# Media

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MIT Technology Review: Harvard Scientists Moving Ahead on Plans for Atmospheric Geoengineering Experiments

"The climate researchers intend to launch a high-altitude balloon that would spray a small quantity of reflective particles into the stratosphere."

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24.03.2017

# Media

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the guardian: US scientists launch world's biggest solar geoengineering study

"Research programme will send aerosol injections into the earth’s upper atmosphere to study the risks and benefits of a future solar tech-fix for climate change"

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22.03.2017

# New Publications

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Visioni, Daniele; et al. (2017): Sulfate geoengineering. A review of the factors controlling the needed injection of sulfur dioxide

Visioni, Daniele; Pitari, Giovanni; Aquila, Valentina (2017): Sulfate geoengineering. A review of the factors controlling the needed injection of sulfur dioxide. In Atmos. Chem. Phys 17 (6), pp. 3879–3889. DOI: 10.5194/acp-17-3879-2017.

"A review of previous studies on these effects is presented here, with an outline of the important factors that control the amount of sulfur dioxide to be injected in an eventual realization of the experiment. However, we need to take into account that atmospheric models used for these studies have shown a wide range of climate sensitivity and differences in the response to stratospheric volcanic aerosols. In addition, large uncertainties exist in the estimate of some of these aerosol effects."

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