03.03.2015

# New Publications

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Wilhelm, Micah; et al. (2015): Climate engineering of vegetated land for hot extremes mitigation: an Earth System Model sensitivity study

Wilhelm, Micah; Davin, Edouard L.; Seneviratne, Sonia I. (2015): Climate engineering of vegetated land for hot extremes mitigation: an Earth System Model sensitivity study. In J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., pp. n/a. DOI 10.1002/2014JD022293.

"Here we present the results of a series of transient global climate engineering sensitivity experiments performed with the Community Earth System Model (CESM) over the time period 1950-2100 under historical and RCP8.5 scenarios. Four sets of experiments are performed in which the surface albedo over snow-free vegetated grid points is increased respectively by 0.05, 0.10, 0.15 and 0.20."

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27.02.2015

# New Publications

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Heyen, Daniel; et al. (2015): Regional Disparities in Solar Radiation Management Impacts. Limitations to Simple Assessments and the Role of Diverging Preferences

Heyen, Daniel; Wiertz, Thilo; Irvine, Peter J. (2015): Regional Disparities in Solar Radiation Management Impacts. Limitations to Simple Assessments and the Role of Diverging Preferences (IASS Working Paper).

"Our main focus is the prevalent assumption in SRM research that, for all regions, any deviation from a past climate state inflicts damages."

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08.12.2014

# Media

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ClimateProgress Blog: Geoengineering Gone Wild: Newsweek Touts Turning Humans Into Hobbits To Save Climate

Response to Newsweek article. "The media likes geoengineering stories because they are clickbait involving all sorts of eye-popping science fiction (non)solutions to climate change that don’t actually require anything of their readers (or humanity) except infinite credulousness. And so Newsweek informs us that adorable ants might solve the problem or maybe phytoplankton can if given Popeye-like superstrength with a diet of iron or, as we’ll see, maybe we humans can, if we allow ourselves to be turned into hobbit-like creatures."

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08.12.2014

# New Publications

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Baum, Seth D. (2014): The great downside dilemma for risky emerging technologies

Baum, Seth D. (2014): The great downside dilemma for risky emerging technologies. In Phys. Scr. 89 (12), p. 128004–128004. DOI 10.1088/0031-8949/89/12/128004.

"This article discusses the great downside dilemma posed by the decision of whether or not to use these technologies. The dilemma is: use the technology, and risk the downside of catastrophic failure, or do not use the technology, and suffer through life without it."

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18.11.2014

# Media

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Harvard News: Adjusting Earth’s thermostat, with caution

"Harvard scientists say aspects of solar geoengineering can—and should—be tested without need for full-scale deployment"

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17.11.2014

# New Publications

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Corner, Adam; Pidgeon, Nick (2014): Geoengineering, climate change scepticism and the ‘moral hazard’ argument: an experimental study of UK public perceptions

Corner, Adam; Pidgeon, Nick (2014): Geoengineering, climate change scepticism and the ‘moral hazard’ argument: an experimental study of UK public perceptions. In Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society 372 (2031). DOI 10.1098/rsta.2014.0063.

"In this paper, we describe an online experiment with a representative sample of the UK public, in which participants read one of two arguments (either endorsing or rejecting the idea that geoengineering poses a moral hazard). The argument endorsing the idea of geoengineering as a moral hazard was perceived as more convincing overall."

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17.11.2014

# New Publications

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Cooper, Garry; et al. (2014): Preliminary results for salt aerosol production intended for marine cloud brightening, using effervescent spray atomization

Cooper, Garry; Foster, Jack; Galbraith, Lee; Jain, Sudhanshu; Neukermans, Armand; Ormondo, Bob (2014): Preliminary results for salt aerosol production intended for marine cloud brightening, using effervescent spray atomization. In Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society 372 (2031). DOI 10.1098/rsta.2014.0055.

"The large-scale production of vast numbers of suitable salt nuclei and their upward launch is one of the main technological barriers to the experimental testing of marine cloud brightening (MCB). Very promising, though not definitive, results have been obtained using an adapted version of effervescent spray atomization."

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17.11.2014

# New Publications

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Oldham, P.; et al. (2014): Mapping the landscape of climate engineering

Oldham, P.; Szerszynski, Bronislaw; Stilgoe, Jack; Brown, Casey; Eacott, B.; Yuille, A. (2014): Mapping the landscape of climate engineering. In Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society 372 (2031). DOI 10.1098/rsta.2014.0065.

"In the absence of a governance framework for climate engineering technologies such as solar radiation management (SRM), the practices of scientific research and intellectual property acquisition can de facto shape the development of the field. It is therefore important to make visible emerging patterns of research and patenting, which we suggest can effectively be done using bibliometric methods."

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14.11.2014

# Media

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ClimateWire: Legal mess hampers understanding of a major CO2 sequestration test

Second part of the ClimateWire article. "The second phase of what is believed to be the world's largest ocean-based geoengineering experiment started out with an early morning knock on the door of the Vancouver offices of the aboriginal corporation in British Columbia that had conducted it."

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10.11.2014

# Media

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New York Times: Climate Tools Seek to Bend Nature’s Path

On Olivine and other CE methods. "Olivine has been doing this naturally for billions of years, but Dr. Schuiling wants to speed up the process by spreading it on fields and beaches and using it for dikes, pathways, even sandboxes. Sprinkle enough of the crushed rock around, he says, and it will eventually remove enough CO2 to slow the rise in global temperatures."

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