20.01.2017

# Media

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Space.com: Geoengineering Earth's Atmosphere: How It Could Affect Astronomy

"Adding particles into the air could have a number of important ramifications, including affecting how well astronomers can view the night sky. According to Lowenthal, some studies have shown that adding clouds to the atmosphere can increase the brightening of the night sky by as much as 25 percent. But that doesn't mean it shouldn't be done."

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16.01.2017

# New Publications

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Gabriel, Corey J.; et al. (2017): The G4Foam Experiment. Global climate impacts of regional ocean albedo modification

Gabriel, Corey J.; Robock, Alan; Xia, Lili; Zambri, Brian; Kravitz, Ben (2017): The G4Foam Experiment. Global climate impacts of regional ocean albedo modification. In: Atmos. Chem. Phys. 17 (1), S. 595–613. DOI: 10.5194/acp-17-595-2017.

"Here we present the results of climate model simulations of a unique Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project Testbed experiment to investigate the benefits and risks of a scheme that would brighten certain oceanic regions. The National Center for Atmospheric Research CESM CAM4-Chem global climate model was modified to simulate a scheme in which the albedo of the ocean surface is increased over the subtropical ocean gyres in the Southern Hemisphere."

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16.01.2017

# New Publications

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Kravitz, Ben; et al. (2017): Understanding How Climate Engineering Can Offset Climate Change. Sixth Meeting of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project; Oslo, Norway, 21–22 June 2016

Kravitz, Ben; Robock, Alan; Kristjánsson, Jón (2017): Understanding How Climate Engineering Can Offset Climate Change. Sixth Meeting of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project; Oslo, Norway, 21–22 June 2016. In: Eos. DOI: 10.1029/2016EO005279.

"Participants at a meeting in Oslo, Norway, presented new developments in modeling and simulating climate engineering approaches, including stratospheric aerosols, marine cloud brightening, cirrus thinning, and land and ocean brightening."

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12.01.2017

# Media

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Inverse: Solar Engineering Is the Terrible Idea That Just Might Save Us

"Injecting sulfur dioxide by the megaton into the stratosphere is as crazy as it sounds."

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31.12.2016

# Media

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Gizmodo: Geoengineering Could Be a Disaster for Astronomy

"That’s according to new models by Charlie Zender, an atmospheric physicist at the University of California, Irvine who presented the provacatively-titled research poster “Death of Darkness: Artificial Sky Brightness in the Anthropocene” at the the American Geophysical Union conference this month. In a nutshell, Zender found that injecting light-scattering particles into the stratosphere—one of the most widely-discussed strategies for rapidly cooling the planet—would have the unintended side-effect of messing with the incoming light from distant stars and planets."

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22.12.2016

# New Publications

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MacMartin, Douglas G.; Kravitz, Ben (2016): Dynamic climate emulators for solar geoengineering

MacMartin, Douglas G.; Kravitz, Ben (2016): Dynamic climate emulators for solar geoengineering. In: Atmos. Chem. Phys. 16 (24), S. 15789–15799. DOI: 10.5194/acp-16-15789-2016.

"Climate emulators trained on existing simulations can be used to project project the climate effects that result from different possible future pathways of anthropogenic forcing, without further relying on general circulation model (GCM) simulations. We extend this idea to include different amounts of solar geoengineering in addition to different pathways of greenhouse gas concentrations, by training emulators from a multi-model ensemble of simulations from the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)."

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18.12.2016

# New Publications

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Lo, Y. T. Eunice; et al. (2016): Detecting sulphate aerosol geoengineering with different methods

Lo, Y. T. Eunice; Charlton-Perez, Andrew J.; Lott, Fraser C.; Highwood, Eleanor J. (2016): Detecting sulphate aerosol geoengineering with different methods. In: Scientific reports 6, S. 39169. DOI: 10.1038/srep39169.

"Sulphate aerosol injection has been widely discussed as a possible way to engineer future climate. Monitoring it would require detecting its effects amidst internal variability and in the presence of other external forcings. We investigate how the use of different detection methods and filtering techniques affects the detectability of sulphate aerosol geoengineering in annual-mean global-mean near-surface air temperature. This is done by assuming a future scenario that injects 5 Tg yr−1 of sulphur dioxide into the stratosphere and cross-comparing simulations from 5 climate models."

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18.12.2016

# Media

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Chemistry World: Atmospheric limestone dust injection could halt global warming

"Geoengineering using limestone aerosols would also help to stop ozone layer depletion"

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18.12.2016

# Media

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EOS: A Date Under the Stars? Maybe Not with Aerosol Injection

"Injecting aerosols into the atmosphere on purpose could help cool Earth, but new research shows that it could also make the night sky brighter and negatively affect human health."

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13.12.2016

# New Publications

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Keith, David W.; et al. (2016): Stratospheric solar geoengineering without ozone loss

Keith, David W.; Weisenstein, Debra K.; Dykema, John A.; Keutsch, Frank N. (2016): Stratospheric solar geoengineering without ozone loss. In Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, p. 201615572–201615572. DOI 10.1073/pnas.1615572113.

"The combination of emissions cuts and solar geoengineering could reduce climate risks in ways that cannot be achieved by emissions cuts alone: It could keep Earth under the 1.5-degree mark agreed at Paris, and it might stop sea level rise this century. However, this promise comes with many risks. Injection of sulfuric acid into the stratosphere, for example, would damage the ozone layer. Injection of calcite (or limestone) particles rather than sulfuric acid could counter ozone loss by neutralizing acids resulting from anthropogenic emissions, acids that contribute to the chemical cycles that destroy stratospheric ozone. Calcite aerosol geoengineering may cool the planet while simultaneously repairing the ozone layer."

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