23.01.2018

# Media

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Carbon Brief: Geoengineering carries ‘large risks’ for the natural world, studies show

"Reducing the impacts of human-caused climate change through the use of bioenergy with carbon capture and storage – better known as BECCS – could have major consequences for wildlife, forests and water resources, a new study shows."

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23.01.2018

# New Publications

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Heck, Vera; et al. (2018): Biomass-based negative emissions difficult to reconcile with planetary boundaries

Heck, Vera; Gerten, Dieter; Lucht, Wolfgang; Popp, Alexander (2018): Biomass-based negative emissions difficult to reconcile with planetary boundaries. In Nature Climate change 10, p. 105007. DOI: 10.1038/s41558-017-0064-y.

"Roadmaps and socio-economic scenarios compatible with a 2 °C or 1.5 °C goal depend upon NE via bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) to balance remaining GHG emissions. However, large-scale deployment of BECCS would imply significant impacts on many Earth system components besides atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Here we explore the feasibility of NE via BECCS from dedicated plantations and potential trade-offs with planetary boundaries (PBs) for multiple socio-economic pathways. We show that while large-scale BECCS is intended to lower the pressure on the PB for climate change, it would most likely steer the Earth system closer to the PB for freshwater use and lead to further transgression of the PBs for land-system change, biosphere integrity and biogeochemical flows."

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20.01.2018

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Bellona: EU Parliament concludes synthetic low carbon fuels should indeed be low carbon

"Yesterday, the European Parliament voted on the use of renewable energy in the coming decade. Of all the big issues on the radar, the Parliament caught the one that tried to fly under it – synthetic fossil fuels. Produced by using massive amounts of renewable energy and fossil CO2 from industrial sources, the fuel would be emitting that same fossil CO2 back to the atmosphere from the tailpipe of the car it’s combusted in. By requiring the use of CO2 captured from the ambient air for its production, the Parliament ensured that the so called synthetic low carbon fuel indeed remains low carbon. However, much remains wanting in the renewable energy directive, but in this regard the Parliament move prevents CO2 laundering and false climate accounting of new synthetic fossil fuels."

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20.01.2018

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Triple Pundit: Planting Trees Has Become a Big Business

"Nevertheless, there are companies finding success in this sector. One of them is United Kingdom-based Biocarbon Engineering, which operates a fleet of drones reforesting areas that are difficult to access. The Dutch firm Land Life Company, maker of water vessels based on an ancient Mesopotamian technology, manages ongoing projects from Chile to Zambia and expects to be profitable in a few years. Land Life claims its “cocoons,” made out recycled wood pulp, offer a much higher survival rate for tree seedlings compared to traditional tree planting methods."

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19.01.2018

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The Hindu: A new weapon in the carbon fight

"The ability of soils to sequester carbon as a win-win strategy must be recognised by policymakers"

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19.01.2018

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Nori: Podcast with Klaus Lackner

"Podcast with Dr. Klaus Lackner of ASU’s Center for Negative Carbon Emissions"

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14.01.2018

# New Publications

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Yamagata, Yoshiki; et al. (2018): Estimating water–food–ecosystem trade-offs for the global negative emission scenario (IPCC-RCP2.6)

Yamagata, Yoshiki; Hanasaki, Naota; Ito, Akihiko; Kinoshita, Tsuguki; Murakami, Daisuke; Zhou, Qian (2018): Estimating water–food–ecosystem trade-offs for the global negative emission scenario (IPCC-RCP2.6). In Sustain Sci 28, p. 113. DOI: 10.1007/s11625-017-0522-5.

"In this study, we assess the impact of BECCS deployment scenarios on the land systems including land use, water resources, and ecosystem services. Specifically, we assess three land-use scenarios to achieve the total amount of 3.3 GtC year−1 (annual negative emission level required for IPCC-RCP 2.6) emission reduction by growing bioenergy crops which requires huge use of global agricultural and forest lands and water."

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14.01.2018

# New Publications

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Faran, Turaj S.; Olsson, Lennart (2018): Geoengineering. Neither economical, nor ethical—a risk–reward nexus analysis of carbon dioxide removal

Faran, Turaj S.; Olsson, Lennart (2018): Geoengineering. Neither economical, nor ethical—a risk–reward nexus analysis of carbon dioxide removal. In Int Environ Agreements 27 (12), p. 555. DOI: 10.1007/s10784-017-9383-8.

"Using the recently developed approach of risk–reward nexus (RRN) in the economics of innovation, we question the economic viability of CDR. The main argument is simple: if one uses the new framework of RRN in evaluating the innovations involved in the CDR branch of geoengineering, not only does one include more areas of risk but also one has to consider a broader base for distributing the rewards. Consequently, from RRN’s point of view, it would be less likely to find investing in CDR economically viable for the investor firms."

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14.01.2018

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Eco Ri: Carbon-Capture Machines Part of Southern New England's 'Climate Change Moonshot' Initiative

"Graciela Chichilnisky has a machine that removes carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and she wants to build them in Rhode Island, Connecticut, and Massachusetts. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology-trained mathematician is a professor of economics at Columbia University and the CEO and co-founder of Global Thermostat, a New York City company that produces industrial-scale systems that collect carbon dioxide and sell it for commercial uses, such as carbonating soda, making plastic, or feeding plants."

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13.01.2018

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Eureka Alert: Thinking outside the box on climate mitigation

On Obersteiner, Michael; et al. (2018). ""Many currently used emissions pathways assume that we can slowly decrease fossil fuel emissions today and make up for it later with heavy implementation of negative emissions technologies," says IIASA Ecosystems Services and Management Program Director Michael Obersteiner, lead author of the article. "This is a problem because it assumes we can put the burden on future generations--which is neither a realistic assumption nor is it morally acceptable from an intergenerational equity point of view.""

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