08.05.2018

# Calls & events

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Newsletter of Week 19 of 2018

The newsletter of calendar week 19 in 2018 is now available here.


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08.05.2018

# New Publications

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Brassard, Patrick; et al. (2018): Effect of six engineered biochars on GHG emissions from two agricultural soils. A short-term incubation study

Brassard, Patrick; Godbout, Stéphane; Palacios, Joahnn H.; Jeanne, Thomas; Hogue, Richard; Dubé, Patrick et al. (2018): Effect of six engineered biochars on GHG emissions from two agricultural soils. A short-term incubation study. In Geoderma 327, pp. 73–84. DOI: 10.1016/j.geoderma.2018.04.022.

"The aim of this research project was to test the hypothesis that only biochars with specific requirements (low H/Corg and O/Corg ratios, high C/N ratio) can reduce soil N2O emissions without increasing CO2 emissions in the short term. A 45-days incubation study was carried out, in which six engineered biochars made from the pyrolysis of wood, switchgrass and the solid fraction of pig manure (SFPM), were amended to two agricultural soils (loamy sand and silt loam) at a dose of 2% (w/w) in 1-liter jars."

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08.05.2018

# Calls & events

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Abstracts open: Negative Emissions Conference 2018

Deadline: 15. July 2018

Abstracts are now accepted for the Negative Emissions Conference 2018 in Canberra / Australia.

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08.05.2018

# New Publications

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Reynolds, Jesse (2018): Governing Experimental Responses. Negative Emissions Technologies and Solar Climate Engineering

Reynolds, Jesse (2018): Governing Experimental Responses. Negative Emissions Technologies and Solar Climate Engineering. In Andrew Jordan, Dave Huitema, Harro van Asselt (Eds.): Governing Climate Change. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 285-302.

"This chapter places the governance of climate engineering in a polycentric governance conceptual framework. Following an introduction to climate engineering proposals and their governance needs, I discuss existing climate engineering governance. The chapter then explores the extent to which climate engineering governance is polycentric, prospects for its future polycentricity and what – if anything – this implies for climate governance more generally."

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08.05.2018

# Media

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C2G2: Paths toward decisions on solar geoengineering

"The absence of effective, comprehensive governance surrounding the research and decision-making around the potential deployment of solar geoengineering technologies (as part of the global risk management approach for climate change) poses a critical risk to current and future generations."

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04.05.2018

# Media

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Express: C2G2 director outlines geoengineering targets

"C2G2 director Janoz Pasztor claims that to reach the required suggested sustainable development goal to reach Paris' Agreement of 1.5 to 2 degrees major carbon emissions reductions would be needed or to completely cut out carbon from the atmosphere."

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04.05.2018

# New Publications

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Daggash, H. A.; et al. (2018): Closing the carbon cycle to maximise climate change mitigation. Power-to-methanol vs. power-to-direct air capture

Daggash, H. A.; Patzschke, C. F.; Heuberger, C. F.; Zhu, L.; Hellgardt, K.; Fennell, P. S. et al. (2018): Closing the carbon cycle to maximise climate change mitigation. Power-to-methanol vs. power-to-direct air capture. In Sustainable Energy Fuels 5 (12), p. 498. DOI: 10.1039/C8SE00061A.

"This study sets out to quantify (a) the amount of curtailed renewable energy that is likely to be available in the coming decades, (b) the amount of fossil CO2 emissions which can be avoided by using this curtailed energy to convert CO2 to methanol for use as a transport fuel – power-to-fuel, with the counterfactual of using that curtailed energy to directly remove CO2 from the atmosphere via direct air capture (DAC) and subsequent underground storage, power-to-DAC."

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04.05.2018

# Media

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Billionaire: The Carbon Killers — Carbon-reduction Companies Seek Funds

"In principle, performance-based carbon markets, a well-design carbon tax, a cap-and-trade allowance system, further regulation, could all do the trick to finance this," says Holmes. "But cutting emissions is an immense, systemic, industrial problem. Ultimately it will come down to good governments and good policy to create conditions that entrepreneurs and individuals can go out and act upon."

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04.05.2018

# Media

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The Keith Group: Why we chose not to patent solar geoengineering technologies

"We broadly oppose commercial development solar geoengineering. In our view, a central objective of solar geoengineering research is to develop credible assessments of its risks and efficacy. Credibility depends, in part, on confidence that the risks of solar geoengineering are not concealed, that its effectiveness is not exaggerated. Such credibility can, in our view, be best generated by a transparent multipolar research effort."

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04.05.2018

# New Publications

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Smith, Jordan P.; et al. (2018): Production of Sulfates Onboard an Aircraft. Implications for the Cost and Feasibility of Stratospheric Solar Geoengineering

Smith, Jordan P.; Dykema, John A.; Keith, David W. (2018): Production of Sulfates Onboard an Aircraft. Implications for the Cost and Feasibility of Stratospheric Solar Geoengineering. In Earth and Space Science 5.01 (2), p. 835. DOI: 10.1002/2018EA000370.

"We examine the possibility of producing the relevant sulfur species, SO2 or SO3, by in situ conversion from elemental sulfur onboard an aircraft. We provide a first‐order engineering analysis of an open cycle chemical plant for in situ sulfur to sulfate conversion using a Brayton cycle combustor and a catalytic converter. We find that such a plant could have sufficiently low mass that the overall requirement for mass transport to the lower stratosphere may be reduced by roughly a factor of 2. All else equal, this suggests that—for a given radiative forcing—the cost of delivering sulfate aerosols may be nearly halved."

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