17.09.2017

# New Publications

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Xu, Yangyang; Ramanathan, Veerabhadran (2017): Well below 2 °C: Mitigation strategies for avoiding dangerous to catastrophic climate changes

Xu, Yangyang; Ramanathan, Veerabhadran (2017): Well below 2 °C: Mitigation strategies for avoiding dangerous to catastrophic climate changes. In Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1618481114.

"We outline a three-lever strategy to limit the central warming below the dangerous level and the LPHI below the catastrophic level, both in the near term (<2050) and in the long term (2100): the carbon neutral (CN) lever to achieve zero net emissions of CO2, the super pollutant (SP) lever to mitigate short-lived climate pollutants, and the carbon extraction and sequestration (CES) lever to thin the atmospheric CO2 blanket. Pulling on both CN and SP levers and bending the emissions curve by 2020 can keep the central warming below dangerous levels."

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17.09.2017

# New Publications

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Himmelsbach, Raffael (2017): How scientists advising the European Commission on research priorities view climate engineering proposals

Himmelsbach, Raffael (2017): How scientists advising the European Commission on research priorities view climate engineering proposals. In sci public policy. DOI: 10.1093/scipol/scx053.

"This study contributes to a growing body of research that studies how different societal actors view climate engineering (CE) in an effort to ‘open up’ received framings and make them amenable to deliberations. [...] Drawing on fifteen interviews, the study explores how scientists who advise the European Commission on research funding priorities regarding climate change and sustainability view CE. They considered CE as treating the symptoms rather than the causes of climate change, as interfering in complex and unpredictable natural systems, and as engendering questions of distributive justice."

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17.09.2017

# Media

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Euractiv: Parliament adds forest ‘sinks’ to EU’s 2030 carbon budget

"MEPs approved new rules on Wednesday (13 September) accounting for the “negative emissions” from forestry as part of the EU’s 2030 climate change policy, a move welcomed by conservationists but which scientists warn risks creating incentives to burn cheap biomass. The EU has a target to cut emissions by 40% by 2030 (compared to 1990 levels), and forests are part of the plan to achieve this. In the EU, forests currently grow more than they are harvested. As a result, they act as a net “sink” for carbon dioxide, removing more than 400 Mt CO2 from the atmosphere annually, equivalent to 10% of total greenhouse gas emissions."

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17.09.2017

# Media

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OUP Blog: How to fight climate change (and save the world)

"The only one that can really save us is the direct removal of CO2 from the atmosphere through some device which sucks ordi­nary air in at one end and emits it again at the other minus its CO2 content, and does so at a less than impossible price. It is a problem in chemistry, physics, and technology, a giant problem, but not one that is greater than that of building a huge bomb out of a reaction which previously was only observed among single atoms in a laboratory. It is the most important problem that the world faces."

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17.09.2017

# Media

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The Herald: Professor Stephen Salter: Meet the Scot who's invented a way to calm killer hurricanes

"A SCOTTISH professor has come up with what he claims is a new way to cool ocean surface waters and weaken violent tropical storms like Hurricane Irma which devastated the Caribbean and US coast last week. Professor Stephen Salter’s 'spray ships' would shoot water into the earth’s atmosphere to increase the amount of sunlight reflected back into space from the tops of thin, low-level clouds and produce a cooling effect."

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14.09.2017

# Media

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The Crimson: Interview with Steve C. Wofsy

"Wofsy and his team maintain a worldwide network of ground and airborne instruments dedicated to monitoring changes in the climate and the atmosphere. They are currently preparing to fly 70,000 km in order to measure pollution in the remotest areas of the world. ​"

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12.09.2017

# New Publications

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Talberg, Anita; et al. (2017): Geoengineering governance-by-default. An earth system governance perspective

Talberg, Anita; Christoff, Peter; Thomas, Sebastian; Karoly, David (2017): Geoengineering governance-by-default. An earth system governance perspective. In Int Environ Agreements 54 (03), p. 421. DOI: 10.1007/s10784-017-9374-9.

"This paper describes and analyses the geoengineering governance landscape that has developed in the absence of explicit geoengineering regulation. An Earth System Governance perspective provides insight into the formation of norms resulting from an overlap in international treaties and from the actions of engaged non-state agents. Specifically, the paper explores the instruments and actors having effect in existing formal and informal geoengineering governance mechanisms. It finds that geoengineering is subject to a form of ‘governance-by-default’."

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11.09.2017

# Calls & events

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Newsletter of Week 37 of 2017

The newsletter of calendar week 37 in 2017 is now available here.


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11.09.2017

# Media

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Mach: Could 'Re-Engineering' Earth Help Ease the Hurricane Threat?

"Scientists say seeding the stratosphere with tiny particles could reduce the number of hurricanes by 50 percent."

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11.09.2017

# New Publications

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Harrison, Daniel P. (2017): Global negative emissions capacity of ocean macronutrient fertilization

Harrison, Daniel P. (2017): Global negative emissions capacity of ocean macronutrient fertilization. In Environ. Res. Lett. 12 (3), p. 35001. DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/aa5ef5.

"Utilizing global datasets of oceanographic field measurements, and output from a high resolution global circulation model, the current study provides the first comprehensive assessment of the global potential for carbon sequestration from ocean macronutrient fertilization (OMF). Sufficient excess phosphate exists outside the iron limited surface ocean to support once-off sequestration of up to 3.6 Pg C by fertilization with nitrogen. Ongoing maximum capacity of nitrogen only fertilization is estimated at 0.7 ± 0.4 Pg C yr−1."

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