27.03.2017

# New Publications

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Montserrat, Francesc; et al. (2017): Olivine Dissolution in Seawater: Implications for CO2 Sequestration through Enhanced Weathering in Coastal Environments

Montserrat, Francesc; Renforth, Phil; Hartmann, Jens; Leermakers, Martine; Knops, Pol; Meysman, Filip J. R. (2017): Olivine Dissolution in Seawater: Implications for CO2 Sequestration through Enhanced Weathering in Coastal Environments. In Environ. Sci. Technol. DOI: 10.1021/acs.est.6b05942.

"Here, we present results from batch reaction experiments, in which forsteritic olivine was subjected to rotational agitation in different seawater media for periods of days to months. Olivine dissolution caused a significant increase in alkalinity of the seawater with a consequent DIC increase due to CO2 invasion, thus confirming viability of the basic concept of enhanced silicate weathering."

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24.03.2017

# New Publications

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Rockström, Johan; et al. (2017): A roadmap for rapid decarbonization

Rockström, Johan; Gaffney, Owen; Rogelj, Joeri; Meinshausen, Malte; Nakicenovic, Nebojsa; Schellnhuber, Hans Joachim (2017): A roadmap for rapid decarbonization. In Science 355 (6331), pp. 1269–1271. DOI: 10.1126/science.aah3443.

Including negative emissions/BECCS. "Complemented by immediately instigated, scalable carbon removal and efforts to ramp down land-use CO2 emissions, this can lead to net-zero emissions around mid-century, a path necessary to limit warming to well below 2°C."

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24.03.2017

# New Publications

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Lenton, Andrew; et al. (2017): How Will Earth Respond to Plans for Carbon Dioxide Removal?

Lenton, Andrew; Keller, David; Pfister, Patrik (2017): How Will Earth Respond to Plans for Carbon Dioxide Removal? In Eos. DOI: 10.1029/2017EO068385.

Meeting Report. "First Workshop of the Carbon Dioxide Removal Model Intercomparison Project; Potsdam, Germany, 20–22 September 2016"

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22.03.2017

# New Publications

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Visioni, Daniele; et al. (2017): Sulfate geoengineering. A review of the factors controlling the needed injection of sulfur dioxide

Visioni, Daniele; Pitari, Giovanni; Aquila, Valentina (2017): Sulfate geoengineering. A review of the factors controlling the needed injection of sulfur dioxide. In Atmos. Chem. Phys 17 (6), pp. 3879–3889. DOI: 10.5194/acp-17-3879-2017.

"A review of previous studies on these effects is presented here, with an outline of the important factors that control the amount of sulfur dioxide to be injected in an eventual realization of the experiment. However, we need to take into account that atmospheric models used for these studies have shown a wide range of climate sensitivity and differences in the response to stratospheric volcanic aerosols. In addition, large uncertainties exist in the estimate of some of these aerosol effects."

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06.03.2017

# New Publications

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Smith, C. J.; et al. (2017): Impacts of stratospheric sulfate geoengineering on global solar photovoltaic and concentrating solar power resource. (in press)

Smith, C. J.; Crook, J. A.; Crook, R. (2017): Impacts of stratospheric sulfate geoengineering on global solar photovoltaic and concentrating solar power resource. (in press). In Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology.

"We analyze results from the HadGEM2-CCS climate model with stratospheric emissions of 10 Tg yr-1 of SO2, designed to offset global temperature rise by around 1°C. A reduction in concentrating solar power (CSP) output of 5.9% on average over land is shown under SSI compared to a baseline future climate change scenario (RCP4.5) due to a decrease in direct radiation."

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06.03.2017

# New Publications

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Harrison, Daniel P. (2017): Global negative emissions capacity of ocean macronutrient fertilization

Harrison, Daniel P. (2017): Global negative emissions capacity of ocean macronutrient fertilization. In Environ. Res. Lett. 12 (3), p. 35001. DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/aa5ef5.

"Utilizing global datasets of oceanographic field measurements, and output from a high resolution global circulation model, the current study provides the first comprehensive assessment of the global potential for carbon sequestration from ocean macronutrient fertilization (OMF). Sufficient excess phosphate exists outside the iron limited surface ocean to support once-off sequestration of up to 3.6 Pg C by fertilization with nitrogen. Ongoing maximum capacity of nitrogen only fertilization is estimated at 0.7 ± 0.4 Pg C yr−1. "

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05.03.2017

# New Publications

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Minx, Jan C.; et al. (2017): Fast growing research on negative emissions

Minx, Jan C.; Lamb, William F.; Callaghan, Max W.; Bornmann, Lutz; Fuss, Sabine (2017): Fast growing research on negative emissions. In Environ. Res. Lett. 12 (3), p. 35007. DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/aa5ee5

"In this paper we use scientometric methods and topic modelling to identify and characterize the available evidence on NETs as recorded in the Web of Science. We find that the development of the literature on NETs has started later than for climate change as a whole, but proceeds more quickly by now. A total number of about 2900 studies have accumulated between 1991 and 2016 with almost 500 new publications in 2016."

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05.03.2017

# New Publications

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Ito, Akihiko (2017): Solar radiation management and ecosystem functional responses

Ito, Akihiko (2017): Solar radiation management and ecosystem functional responses. In Climatic Change 10, p. 84018. DOI: 10.1007/s10584-017-1930-3.

"In this study, I evaluate the impacts of SRM deployment on terrestrial ecosystem functions using a process-based ecosystem model (the Vegetation Integrative Simulator for Trace gases, VISIT) driven by the climate projections by multiple climate models. In the SRM-oriented climate projections, massive injection of sulphate aerosols into the stratosphere lead to increased scattering of solar radiation and delayed anthropogenic climate warming. The VISIT simulations show that canopy light absorption and gross primary production are enhanced in subtropics in spite of the slight decrease of total incident solar radiation."

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02.03.2017

# New Publications

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Greene, Charles H.; et al. (2017): Geoengineering, Marine Microalgae, and Climate Stabilization in the 21 st Century

Greene, Charles H.; Huntley, Mark E.; Archibald, Ian; Gerber, Léda N.; Sills, Deborah L.; Granados, Joe et al. (2017): Geoengineering, Marine Microalgae, and Climate Stabilization in the 21 st Century. In Earth's Future. DOI: 10.1002/2016EF000486.

"Here, we describe an alternative approach based on the large-scale industrial production of marine microalgae. When cultivated with proper attention to power, carbon, and nutrient sources, microalgae can be processed to produce a variety of biopetroleum products, including carbon neutral biofuels for the transportation sector and long-lived, potentially carbon-negative construction materials for the built environment."

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27.02.2017

# New Publications

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Gunderson, Ryan; et al. (2017): Ideological obstacles to effective climate policy. The greening of markets, technology, and growth

Gunderson, Ryan; Stuart, Diana; Petersen, Brian (2017): Ideological obstacles to effective climate policy. The greening of markets, technology, and growth. In Capital & Class 2 (7), 030981681769212. DOI: 10.1177/0309816817692127.

"In light of the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement, this project synthesizes and advances critiques of the possibility of a sustainable capitalism by adopting an explicit ‘negative’ theory of ideology, understood as ideas that conceal contradictions through the reification and/or legitimation of the existing social order. Prominent climate change policy frameworks – the ‘greening’ of markets (market-corrective measures), technology (alternative energy, energy efficiency, and geoengineering), and growth (the green growth strategy) – are shown to conceal one or both of the two systemic socio-ecological contradictions inherent in the current social formation."

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