June 2018

22.06.2018

# Media

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Carbon Brief: Guest post: Seven key things to know about ‘negative emissions’

"Despite the ambitious long-term climate goals of the Paris Agreement, there remains a distinct lack of success at ushering in immediate and sustained reductions in global CO2 emissions. This cognitive dissonance has seen the topic of “negative emissions” – also known as “carbon dioxide removal” (CDR) – move into the limelight in climate science and policy discussions."

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22.06.2018

# New Publications

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Mayes, William Matthew; et al. (2018): Atmospheric CO2 sequestration in iron and steel slag: Consett, Co. Durham, UK.

Mayes, William Matthew; Riley, Alex L.; Gomes, Helena I.; Brabham, Peter; Hamlyn, Joanna; Pullin, Huw; Renforth, Phil (2018): Atmospheric CO2 sequestration in iron and steel slag. Consett, Co. Durham, UK. In: Environmental science & technology. DOI: 10.1021/acs.est.8b01883.

"Carbonate formation in waste from the steel industry could constitute a non-trivial proportion of global requirements to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere at potentially low cost. To constrain this potential, we examined atmospheric carbon dioxide sequestration in a >20 million tonne legacy slag deposit in northern England, UK. Carbonates formed from the drainage water of the heap had stable carbon and oxygen isotopes between -12 and -25 ‰ and -5 and -18 ‰ for δ13C and δ18O respectively, suggesting atmospheric carbon dioxide sequestration in high pH solutions. From analysis of solution saturation state, we estimate that between 280 and 2,900 tCO2 have precipitated from the drainage waters. However, by combining a thirty-seven-year dataset of the drainage water chemistry with geospatial analysis, we estimate that <1 % of the maximum carbon capture potential of the deposit may have been realised. This implies that uncontrolled deposition of slag is insufficient to maximise carbon sequestration, and there may be considerable quantities of unreacted legacy deposits available for atmospheric carbon sequestration."

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22.06.2018

# Media

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Earth911: Healthy Climate Alliance: Restore the Climate by 2050

"The Healthy Climate Alliance has a bold and achievable plan to return the global climate to the conditions our great-grandparents enjoyed at the dawn of the 20th century. They want to do it by 2050, using a combination of carbon-removal technologies and natural systems to pull carbon dioxide out of the air and store it in construction materials, the bottom of the oceans, and through other economically viable programs."

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21.06.2018

# New Publications

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Keller, David; et al. (2018): The Effects of Carbon Dioxide Removal on the Carbon Cycle

Keller, David P.; Lenton, Andrew; Littleton, Emma W.; Oschlies, Andreas; Scott, Vivian; Vaughan, Naomi E. (2018): The Effects of Carbon Dioxide Removal on the Carbon Cycle. In: Curr Clim Change Rep 118 (1), S. 105. DOI: 10.1007/s40641-018-0104-3.

"Here, we review the carbon cycle responses to different CDR approaches and highlight the often-overlooked interaction and feedbacks between carbon reservoirs that ultimately determines CDR efficacy. We also identify future research that will be needed if CDR is to play a role in climate change mitigation, these include coordinated studies to better understand (i) the underlying mechanisms of each method, (ii) how they could be explicitly simulated, (iii) how reversible changes in the climate and carbon cycle are, and (iv) how to evaluate and monitor CDR."

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21.06.2018

# New Publications

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Gough, Clair; et al. (2018): Challenges to the use of BECCS as a keystone technology in pursuit of 1.5⁰C

Gough, Clair; Garcia-Freites, Samira; Jones, Christopher; Mander, Sarah; Moore, Brendan; Pereira, Cristina et al. (2018): Challenges to the use of BECCS as a keystone technology in pursuit of 1.5⁰C. In: Glob. Sustain. 1, S. 95. DOI: 10.1017/sus.2018.3.

"Biomass energy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) is represented in many integrated assessment models as a keystone technology in delivering the Paris Agreement on climate change. This paper explores six key challenges in relation to large scale BECCS deployment and considers ways to address these challenges. Research needs to consider how BECCS fits in the context of other mitigation approaches, how it can be accommodated within existing policy drivers and goals, identify where it fits within the wider socioeconomic landscape, and ensure that genuine net negative emissions can be delivered on a global scale."

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21.06.2018

# Media

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Solarify: CO2 extraction from air soon economical?

German article on CE.

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20.06.2018

# Media

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Universität Wien Medienportal: Air pollution is global

German article on CE.

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20.06.2018

# Media

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Universität Wien Medienportal: Mojib Latif: We have to decrease CO2 emission

German article on CE.

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18.06.2018

# Calls & events

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Newsletter of Week 25 of 2018

The newsletter of calendar week 25 in 2018 is now available here.


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18.06.2018

# New Publications

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Talberg, Anita; et al. (2018): A scenario process to inform Australian geoengineering policy

Talberg, Anita; Thomas, Sebastian; Wiseman, John (2018): A scenario process to inform Australian geoengineering policy. In: Futures. DOI: 10.1016/j.futures.2018.06.003.

"Australia’s role in geoengineering can be described as passive in the global context, but Australia can benefit from an early transition to a low-carbon economy. A review of the evolution of ideas throughout the exercise reveals a process of shared learning that helps to focus governance discussions around key issues. This study is one step towards increasing the presence and influence of the Asia-Pacific in geoengineering discussions, and highlights the value that a tailored scenario exercise can bring to governance discussions."

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