March 2017

29.03.2017

# Projects

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Project: Developing a Research Agenda for Carbon Dioxide Removal and Reliable Sequestration

Project " Developing a Research Agenda for Carbon Dioxide Removal and Reliable Sequestration" funded by US NAS.

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29.03.2017

# Media

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the guardian: Fear of solar geoengineering is healthy – but don't distort our research

"Fear of solar geoengineering is entirely healthy. Its mere prospect might be hyped by fossil fuel interests to thwart emissions cuts. It could be used by one or a few nations in a way that’s harmful to many. There might be some yet undiscovered risk making the technology much less effective in reality than the largely positive story told by computer models."

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28.03.2017

# Calls & events

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Newsletter of Week 13 of 2017

The newsletter of calendar week 13 in 2017 is now available here.


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27.03.2017

# Media

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Pacific Standard: Will geoengineering save the world — or destroy it?

"To combat climate change, some geoengineering technologies can capture carbon emissions and store them in the ocean or underground. Other technologies could disperse sulfuric acid or aerosol particles into the stratosphere to deflect sunlight and cool the planet. Climate engineering has not yet been tested outside the laboratory or field research."

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27.03.2017

# Media

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[press review]: US solar geoengineering field study

Press coverage on Harvard project on testing stratospheric particle injection.


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27.03.2017

# Media

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McGill International Review: Geo-engineering and Our Uncertain Future

"It is probable that, in an attempt to counteract the effects of global warming, humanity will deliberately engage in a large-scale manipulation of environmental processes that affect the Earth’s climate. This could well be one of the most consequential events in human history. We can predict with reasonable confidence that some “geo-engineering” scheme to extensively modify environment systems or control climate will be implemented in the coming decades. There are two main reasons for this."

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27.03.2017

# Media

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the guardian: Trump presidency 'opens door' to planet-hacking geoengineer experiments

"As geoengineer advocates enter Trump administration, plans advance to spray sun-reflecting chemicals into atmosphere"

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27.03.2017

# New Publications

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Montserrat, Francesc; et al. (2017): Olivine Dissolution in Seawater: Implications for CO2 Sequestration through Enhanced Weathering in Coastal Environments

Montserrat, Francesc; Renforth, Phil; Hartmann, Jens; Leermakers, Martine; Knops, Pol; Meysman, Filip J. R. (2017): Olivine Dissolution in Seawater: Implications for CO2 Sequestration through Enhanced Weathering in Coastal Environments. In Environ. Sci. Technol. DOI: 10.1021/acs.est.6b05942.

"Here, we present results from batch reaction experiments, in which forsteritic olivine was subjected to rotational agitation in different seawater media for periods of days to months. Olivine dissolution caused a significant increase in alkalinity of the seawater with a consequent DIC increase due to CO2 invasion, thus confirming viability of the basic concept of enhanced silicate weathering."

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27.03.2017

# Projects

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New Blog: OLIVOA (Enhanced Olivine Weathering)

"OLIvOA is a research initiative investigating the use of enhanced weathering of the silicate mineral olivine against Ocean Acidification. Olivine weathering causes the seawater to become less acidic and increases its capacity to take up (more) carbon dioxide (CO2). OLIvOA 'headquarters' is currently located in Brazil, but collaborates with researchers from all over the world. The epicenter of OLIvOA research is (still) in Europe."

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24.03.2017

# Media

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Cicero: Former UN climate advisor leads initiative to regulate geo-engineering

"Geo-engineering can be a cheap way of instantly lowering the Earth’s temperature - with potentially devastating side effects. The technology is here but international regulation is lacking."

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