30.01.2017

# Media

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Center For Carbon Removal: Leaders in Carbon Removal: Wil Burns

Interview with Wil Burns. "Welcome to the January edition of "Leaders in Carbon Removal"! This month we sat down to chat with Wil Burns, the Co-Executive Director of the Forum for Climate Engineering Assessment in the School of International Service at American University and a research fellow at the Center for Science, Technology, Medicine and Society at University of California, Berkeley."

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30.01.2017

# Media

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GOXI Blog: Carbon Mining

"Carbon mining is a more effective path to climate stability than emission reduction because carbon mining can remove the carbon from the air faster than we add it, providing a rapid path to prevent sea level rise, ocean acidification and loss of biodiversity.  Importantly, carbon mining at large scale can also remove the political division caused by demands to shift away from fossil fuels, by enabling fossil fuel energy production to remain compatible with climate stability. "

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30.01.2017

# Media

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Aeon: Welcome to Terra Sapiens

"Humans have been altering Earth for millennia, but only now are we wise to what we’re doing. How will we use that wisdom?"

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28.01.2017

# Media

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Mail & Guardian: Governments remain silent about bids to geoengineer the climate

"Unwilling to do more to stymie global warming, governments have turned to geoengineering. This covers anything that changes weather patterns, helps to store carbon emissions, and stops the sun’s rays coming through the atmosphere. The activities range from spraying chemicals into the sky to create rain clouds to putting mirrors in the atmosphere to reflect the sun’s rays. One experiment in Canada — a rare case of these being made public — involved dropping iron filings into the ocean to kill plankton so it would sink to the bottom of the ocean and trap carbon dioxide."

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25.01.2017

# New Publications

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de_Richter, Renaud; et al. (2017): Removal of non-CO2 greenhouse gases by large-scale atmospheric solar photocatalysis

de_Richter, Renaud; Ming, Tingzhen; Davies, Philip; Liu, Wei; Caillol, Sylvain (2017): Removal of non-CO2 greenhouse gases by large-scale atmospheric solar photocatalysis. In: Progress in Energy and Combustion Science 60, S. 68–96. DOI: 10.1016/j.pecs.2017.01.001.

"Here review an unusual hybrid device combining photocatalysis with carbon-free electricity with no-intermittency based on the solar updraft chimney. Then we review experimental evidence regarding photocatalytic transformations of non-CO2 GHGs. We propose to combine TiO2-photocatalysis with solar chimney power plants (SCPPs) to cleanse the atmosphere of non-CO2 GHGs."

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24.01.2017

# New Publications

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Oeste, Franz Dietrich; et al. (2017): Climate engineering by mimicking natural dust climate control. The iron salt aerosol method

Oeste, Franz Dietrich; Richter, Renaud de; Ming, Tingzhen; Caillol, Sylvain (2017): Climate engineering by mimicking natural dust climate control. The iron salt aerosol method. In: Earth Syst. Dynam. 8 (1), S. 1–54. DOI: 10.5194/esd-8-1-2017.

"Power stations, ships and air traffic are among the most potent greenhouse gas emitters and are primarily responsible for global warming. Iron salt aerosols (ISAs), composed partly of iron and chloride, exert a cooling effect on climate in several ways. This article aims firstly to examine all direct and indirect natural climate cooling mechanisms driven by ISA tropospheric aerosol particles, showing their cooperation and interaction within the different environmental compartments. Secondly, it looks at a proposal to enhance the cooling effects of ISA in order to reach the optimistic target of the Paris climate agreement to limit the global temperature increase between 1.5 and 2 °C."

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24.01.2017

# New Publications

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Coffman, D’Maris; Lockley, Andrew (2017): Carbon dioxide removal and the futures market

Coffman, D’Maris; Lockley, Andrew (2017): Carbon dioxide removal and the futures market. In: Environ. Res. Lett. 12 (1), S. 15003. DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/aa54e8.

"We discuss the potential use of futures contracts in Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR) markets; concluding that they have one principal advantage (near-term price security to current polluters), and one principal disadvantage (a combination of high price volatility and high trade volume means contracts issued by the private sector may cause systemic economic risk). Accordingly, we note the potential for the development of futures markets in CDR, but urge caution about the prospects for market failure."

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23.01.2017

# Calls & events

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News Review of Week 04 of 2017

The news review of calendar week 4 in 2017 is now available here.


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23.01.2017

# Media

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Geoengineering Monitor: On eve of Trump inauguration, White House report calls for geoengineering research

"The White House has released a report which for the first time recommends U.S. government-funded research into geoengineering. The report, which was submitted to Congress last week by the Office of Science and Technology Policy, falls short of calling for real-world experiments, laying out a case for research into the science behind large-scale climate intervention and the “possible consequences of any such measures.”"

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23.01.2017

# New Publications

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Smit, Erika C. (2015): Geoengineering. Issues of Accountability in International Law

Smit, Erika C. (2015): Geoengineering. Issues of Accountability in International Law. In: Nevada Law Journal 15 (2), S. 1060–1089.

"As this note shows through congressional hearings, newspaper articles, and international agreements, geoengineering and weather modification have been lingering matters in international law for several decades and will continue to be reviewed, researched, and developed in the years to come. This note examines how international law can provide legal accountability for geoengineering in the event of a catastrophic accident."

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