03.09.2015

# New Publications

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Svoboda, Toby; Hargrove, Eugene C. (2015): Geoengineering, Agent-Regret, and the Lesser of Two Evils Argument

Svoboda, Toby; Hargrove, Eugene C. (2015): Geoengineering, Agent-Regret, and the Lesser of Two Evils Argument. In Environmental Ethics 37 (2), pp. 207–220. DOI: 10.5840/enviroethics201537218 

"According to the “Lesser of Two Evils Argument,” deployment of solar radiation management (SRM) geoengineering in a climate emergency would be morally justified because it likely would be the best option available."

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01.09.2015

# Media

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Huffington Post: A Modest Proposal

"The most efficient method of quickly reducing the global population, and solving the global warming problem, is by nuclear war. A nuclear war between the United States and Russia today, with their nuclear arsenals targeted at cities and industrial areas, would produce tremendous amounts of smoke, blocking out the Sun and making it cold, dark, and dry at the surface."

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01.09.2015

# New Publications

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Manoussi, Vassiliki; Xepapadeas, Anastasios (2015): Cooperation and Competition in Climate Change Policies. Mitigation and Climate Engineering when Countries are Asymmetric

Manoussi, Vassiliki; Xepapadeas, Anastasios (2015): Cooperation and Competition in Climate Change Policies. Mitigation and Climate Engineering when Countries are Asymmetric. In Environ Resource Econ. DOI: 10.1007/s10640-015-9956-3

"We study a dynamic game of climate policy design in terms of emissions and solar radiation management (SRM) involving two heterogeneous countries or group of countries. Countries emit greenhouse gasses (GHGs), and can block incoming radiation by unilateral SRM activities, thus reducing global temperature. Heterogeneity is modelled in terms of the social cost of SRM, the environmental damages due to global warming, the productivity of emissions in terms of generating private benefits, the rate of impatience, and the private cost of geoengineering."

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01.09.2015

# Media

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BERC: Carbon Removal As a Mitigation Strategy

"Carbon removal techniques, while important for fighting climate change, have faced resistance from some in the environmental community due to their perception as a threat to the deployment of other climate change mitigation techniques. Recently, the view that carbon removal is a complement, not a substitute, for other mitigation approaches has gained mainstream acceptance — a positive development that will hopefully help carbon removal solutions emerge in sustainable and appropriate manner for fighting climate change."

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31.08.2015

# Calls & events

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News Review of Week 36

The news review of calendar week 36 in 2015 is now available here.


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31.08.2015

# Media

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Harvard Political Review: Engineering The Climate

"In early July, in Germany’s historic Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities, academics and analysts from a wide range of disciplines gathered to participate in a research symposium on climate engineering. The fledgling field—only some of those present at the conference even consider climate engineering to be their primary research interest—has steadily been picking up momentum over the past decade."

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31.08.2015

# Media

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Friends of the Earth: Tim Flannery’s ‘third way’ is a dead end

Response to Flannery Tim (2015). "Jeremy Tager, a campaigner with Friends of the Earth’s Emerging Tech Project said “Tim Flannery’s proposed ‘third way’ is a dangerous distraction that risks diverting attention away from the urgent need to dramatically reduce the burning of fossil fuels.”"

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31.08.2015

# New Publications

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Mengis, N.; et al. (2015): Uncertainty in the response of transpiration to CO2 and implications for climate change

Mengis, Nadine; Keller, David P.; Eby, M.; Oschlies, Andreas (2015): Uncertainty in the response of transpiration to CO2 and implications for climate change. In Environ. Res. Lett. 10 (9), p. 94001–94001. DOI 10.1088/1748-9326/10/9/094001

Paper from PP 1689. "To assess the impact of this uncertainty on future climate, we perform experiments with an intermediate complexity Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM) for a range of model-imposed transpiration-sensitivities to CO2. Changing the sensitivity of transpiration to CO2 causes simulated terrestrial precipitation to change by −10% to +27% by 2100 under a high emission scenario. This study emphasises the importance of an improved assessment of the dynamics of environmental impact on vegetation to better predict future changes of the terrestrial hydrological and carbon cycles."

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29.08.2015

# New Publications

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Bellamy, R.; Lezaun, J. (2015): Crafting a public for geoengineering

Bellamy, R.; Lezaun, J. (2015): Crafting a public for geoengineering. In Public Understanding of Science. DOI 10.1177/0963662515600965 

"Here, we analyse this rapid trajectory of publicization and explore the particular manner in which the possibility of intentionally altering the Earth’s climate system to curb global warming has been incorporated into the field of ‘public engagement with science’. We describe the initial framing of geoengineering as a singular object of debate and subsequent attempts to ‘unframe’ the issue by placing it within broader discursive fields."

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28.08.2015

# New Publications

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V. N. Aswathy; et al. (2015): Climate extremes in multi-model simulations of stratospheric aerosol and marine cloud brightening climate engineering

V. N. Aswathy; Boucher, O.; Quaas, M.; Niemeier, U.; Muri, H.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Quaas, J. (2015): Climate extremes in multi-model simulations of stratospheric aerosol and marine cloud brightening climate engineering. In Atmos. Chem. Phys. 15 (16), pp. 9593–9610. DOI 10.5194/acp-15-9593-2015 (final paper)

"Simulations from a multi-model ensemble for the RCP4.5 climate change scenario for the 21st century, and for two solar radiation management (SRM) schemes (stratospheric sulfate injection (G3), SULF and marine cloud brightening by sea salt emission SALT) have been analysed in terms of changes in the mean and extremes of surface air temperature and precipitation. The climate engineering and termination periods are investigated. During the climate engineering period, both schemes, as intended, offset temperature increases by about 60 % globally, but are more effective in the low latitudes and exhibit some residual warming in the Arctic (especially in the case of SALT which is only applied in the low latitudes)."

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